The Airplane: How Ideas Gave Us Wings

Front Cover
Harper Collins, Oct 6, 2009 - Transportation - 352 pages
0 Reviews

The Airplane by aerospace industry writer Jay Spencer, former assistant curator of the Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum and the Museum of Flight in Seattle, is the definitive history of how we invented and refined the amazing flying machines that enabled humankind to defy gravity. A fascinating true account certain to enthrall and delight aviation and technology buffs, The Airplane is lavishly illustrated with more than 100 photographs and is the first book ever to explore the development of the jetliner through a fascinating piece-by-piece analysis of the machinery of flight.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

The airplane: how ideas gave us wings

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Spenser (former curator, Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum) has written an engaging text, using a growth metaphor (conception, birth, etc.) to organize the chapters. Much livelier than his 747 ... Read full review

Contents

The Thinker and the Dreamer
1
Wilbur Orville and the World
16
Shapes and Ideas
37
Of Drums and Dragonflies
56
From Box Kites to Bridges
86
CloudCutting Cantilevers
112
Whale Flukes and Arrow Feathers
136
The Chariots Reins
142
Cockpits for Aerial Ships
173
Prometheus Is Pushing
201
Shoes Canoes and Carriage Wheels
238
Voyaging Aloft
253
Making Flying
281
Future
305
Ackowledgments
319
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

Jay Spenser has spent a lifetime studying aviation as a museum curator at the National Air and Space Museum and the Museum of Flight, and as an aerospace industry writer. He is the co-author of 747 and lives in Seattle, Washington.

Bibliographic information