Alsea Texts and Myths

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1920 - Alsea Indians - 304 pages
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Page 195 - Whence didst thou obtain them?" — "Oh! there are many right here on that prairie." — "Is that so ? Then I shall (be able to) gather them close by." — "No. Thou wilt not be able to obtain any. Only those people who are one-eyed (can) catch them. If thou desirest to obtain them, I will take off thee one of thy eyes.
Page 212 - ... with old Indians. According to William Smith's memory, "this fire which raged over a large part of Oregon, took place . . . about 1850." The same general story was obtained by Frachtenberg from the Coos tribe. The translation of William Smith's story from the Alsea language is in part as follows: We were coming back from Siuslaw, when long ago, the world was in flames. Then it seemed to be getting dark all over .... although the sun stood high, nevertheless it threatened to get dark .... "What...
Page 215 - ... threatened to get dark .... "What on earth is nature going to do?" The fire was falling all around us. Wherever it would drop, another fire would start there. Everybody was staying near the ocean on the beach. The fire was flying around just like the birds. All the hills were on fire. Even the hills that were near the sea were burning as soon as the fire arrived at the sea .... For probably ten days it was dark all over. After the fire had cooled off, two of the Indians started back along the...
Page 217 - ... just stay (here) motionless." Then they two were speaking to their (dual) wives. "We two are going to come back to-morrow" — "You two shall take good care of yourselves," thus said my grandmother. Then they started. Where there was a mountain, that place there did not burn. So they two kept on going on that trail, and they arrived at where there was a place (covered) with grass. And only there did the fire reach. Then they two ascended. Now it was gradually getting light all over; just a little...
Page 213 - ... Siuslaw, when long ago, the world was in flames. Then it seemed to be getting dark all over .... although the sun stood high, nevertheless it threatened to get dark .... "What on earth is nature going to do?" The fire was falling all around us. Wherever it would drop, another fire would start there. Everybody was staying near the ocean on the beach. The fire was flying around just like the birds. All the hills were on fire. Even the hills that were near the sea were burning as soon as the fire...
Page 229 - (It) is nothing. The bad thing is gone; nature is well (again). You shall not (think of) anything in your minds." Then they would come together in order that the moon should be looked at. One person would keep on saying, "It is accomplished now; I am going to go back into the house." Thereupon the people would enter their houses again. 23. ExORCISMS DURING A SUN ECLIPSE Whenever the sun was killed (this fact) would be noticed (at once). The face of the sun would seem to be getting red. Then it would...
Page 227 - Do you come out (from) inside; do you come out (from) inside; the moon is now killed."' And it is said that the crow usually kills the moon, and also the eagle, and likewise the chicken hawk and, moreover, the owl. In such a number all the birds habitually assemble whenever they kill the moon. K'is mun'hu k' !ilhal'm hl'k'e hamstl£ kus LEya'tsit.
Page 237 - That was the reason why she wanted to stay behind." After the Wolves came back to their house the oldest Wolf said: "After this we must not be people any longer. We will turn into Wolves and will always hunt for Elk, whom we will kill and devour.
Page 19 - Publs. in Amer. Archseol. and Ethn., ix, no. 1, 1910. . SWANTON, JOHN R. Haida texts and myths. Bull. 29, Bur. Amer. Ethn., 1905. Tlingit myths and texts. Bull. 39, Bur. Amer. Ethn., 1909. TEIT, JAMES. The Shushwap. Publs. Amer. Mus. Nat. Hist., Jesup North Pacific 'Exped., n, pt.
Page 12 - ... was completed by Doctor Frachtenberg. It is now published by the Bureau of American Ethnology as Bulletin 67. There are less than a dozen survivors of the Alsea tribe. This collection is the "literature" of a race that is practically gone. One sentence from page 12 will give a basis for valuation : "Speaking in a general way, Alsea mythology may be said to be characteristic of that area of the Northwest which embraces northern California, Oregon, and Washington.

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