The Greek Romances of Heliodorus, Longus and Achilles Tatius

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G. Bell and Sons, 1893 - Greek literature - 511 pages
 

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Page 492 - But if a woman have long hair, it is a glory to her, for her hair is given her for a covering.
Page 427 - Methought I heard a voice cry, Sleep no more ! Macbeth does murder sleep, the innocent sleep ; Sleep, that knits up the ravell'd sleave of care, The death of each day's life, sore labour's bath, Balm of hurt minds, great nature's second course, Chief nourisher in life's feast ;— Lady M.
Page 365 - He who hath bent him o'er the dead Ere the first day of Death is fled, The first dark day of Nothingness, The last of Danger and Distress, (Before Decay's effacing fingers Have swept the lines where Beauty lingers...
Page 34 - Twere now to be most happy, for I fear My soul hath her content so absolute That not another comfort like to this Succeeds in unknown fate.
Page 278 - It ceased ; yet still the sails made on A pleasant noise till noon, A noise like of a hidden brook In the leafy month of June, That to the sleeping woods all night Singeth a quiet tune.
Page 162 - Fie, fie upon her! There's language in her eye, her cheek, her lip, Nay, her foot speaks ; her wanton spirits look out At every joint and motive of her body.
Page 45 - Like one that on a lonesome road Doth walk in fear and dread, And having once turned round, walks on, And turns no more his head ; Because he knows a frightful fiend Doth close behind him tread.
Page 403 - Methought I had ; and often did I strive To yield the ghost ; but still the envious flood Kept in my soul, and would not let it forth To seek the empty, vast, and wandering air ; But smother'd it within my panting bulk, Which almost burst to belch it in the sea.
Page 410 - She'd come again, and with a greedy ear Devour up my discourse; which I, observing, Took once a pliant hour and found good means To draw from her a prayer of earnest heart That I would all my pilgrimage dilate, Whereof by parcels she had something heard But not intentively. I did consent, And often did beguile her of her tears When I did speak of some distressful stroke That my youth suffered.

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