Mojo Workin': The Old African American Hoodoo System

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University of Illinois Press, Dec 30, 2012 - Social Science - 256 pages
In this book, Katrina Hazzard-Donald explores African Americans' experience and practice of the herbal, healing folk belief tradition known as Hoodoo. Working against conventional scholarship, Hazzard-Donald argues that Hoodoo emerged first in three distinct regions she calls "regional Hoodoo clusters" and that after the turn of the nineteenth century, Hoodoo took on a national rather than regional profile. The first interdisciplinary examination to incorporate a full glossary of Hoodoo culture, Mojo Workin': The Old African American Hoodoo System lays out the movement of Hoodoo against a series of watershed changes in the American cultural landscape. Throughout, Hazzard-Donald distinguishes between "Old tradition Black Belt Hoodoo" and commercially marketed forms that have been controlled, modified, and often fabricated by outsiders; this study focuses on the hidden system operating almost exclusively among African Americans in the Black spiritual underground.
 

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Contents

Prescript
1
A Thematic Overview
19
Slavery and the African Background in the Making of Hoodoo
34
3 The Search for High John the Conquer
68
Sustaining and Transforming Hoodoos Old Black Belt Tradition from
84
Black Belt Hoodoo between the Two World Wars
116
Hoodoo as Health Care Root Doctors Midwives Treaters
135
7 Black Belt Hoodoo in the PostWorld War II Cultural Environment
156
Postscript
179
Notes
187
Glossary
205
Bibliography
211
Index
227
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About the author (2012)

Katrina Hazzard-Donald is an associate professor of sociology, anthropology, and criminal justice at Rutgers University-Camden and the author of Jookin': The Rise of Social Dance Formations in African American Culture.

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