Royal Letters, Charters, and Tracts: Relating to the Colonization of New Scotland, and the Institution of the Order of Knight Baronets of Nova Scotia. 1621-1638, Volume 119

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G. Robb, 1867 - Great Britain - 291 pages
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Page 19 - ... moris marresiis viis semitis aquis stagnis rivolis pratis pascuis et pasturis molendinis multuris et eorum sequelis, aucupationibus venationibus piscationibus, petariis turbariis carbonibus carbonariis, cuniculis cuniculariis Columbis columbariis, fabrilibus brasinis brueriis, et genestis...
Page 86 - Land of New England beginning at a certain place called or known by the name of St Croix next adjoining to New Scotland in...
Page 3 - The Golden Fleece .... Transported from Cambrioll Colchos, out of the southernmost part of the island, commonly called the Newfoundland, by Orpheus Junior, for the general and perpetuall good of Great Britains.
Page 7 - Being much encouraged hereunto by Sir Ferdinando Gorge and some others of the undertakers for New England, I shew them that my countrymen would never adventure in such an enterprise unless it were as there was a New France, a New Spain, and a New England, that they might likewise have a New Scotland...
Page 6 - Cannada sese exonerantem et ab eo pergendo versus orientem per maris oras littorales ejusdem fluvii de Canada ad fluvium stationem navium portum aut littus communiter nomine de Gathepe vel...
Page 3 - ... viis, semitis, aquis, stagnis, rivolis, pratis, pascuis, et pasturis, molendinis, multuris et eorum sequelis, aucupationibus, venationibus, piscationibus, petariis, turbariis, carbonibus, carbonariis, cuniculis, cuniculariis, columbis...
Page 2 - The Aire in Newfoundland is wholesome, good; The Fire, as sweet as any made of wood: The Waters very rich, both salt -and fresh, The Earth more rich, you know it is no lesse, Where all are good, Fire, Water, Earth, and Aire, What man made of these foure would not live there.
Page 92 - ... more numerous, and that the ancient gentry of Scotland esteemed of such a whimsical dignity as of a disparagement rather than addition to their former honour, he bethought himself of a course more profitable for himself, and the future establishment of his own state ; in prosecuting whereof, without the advice of his knights (who represented both his houses of Parliament, clergy and all) like an absolute king indeed, disposed heritably to the French, for a matter of five or six thousand pounds...
Page 85 - America, and to their successors and assigns for ever, all that part of America, lying and being in breadth, from forty degrees of northerly latitude from the equinoctial line, to forty-eight degrees of the said northerly latitude inclusively, and in length, of and within all the breadth aforesaid, throughout the main lands from sea to sea...