Perception, Cognition, and Language: Essays in Honor of Henry and Lila Gleitman

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Dick and Lydia Todd Professor of Cognitive Science Barbara Landau, John Jonides, Barbara Landau, John Sabini, Elissa L. Newport
MIT Press, 2000 - Psychology - 360 pages

The essays range across fields foundational to cognitive science, including perception, attention, memory, and language, using formal, experimental, and neuroscientific approaches to issues of representation and learning.

These original empirical research essays in the psychology of perception, cognition, and language were written in honor of Henry and Lila Gleitman, two of the most prominent psychologists of our time. The essays range across fields foundational to cognitive science, including perception, attention, memory, and language, using formal, experimental, and neuroscientific approaches to issues of representation and learning. An introduction provides a historical perspective on the development of the field from the 1960s onward. The contributors have all been colleagues and students of the Gleitmans, and the collection celebrates their influence on the field of cognitive science.

Contributors
Cynthia Fisher, Susan Goldin-Meadow, Katherine Hirsh-Pasek, John Jonides, Phillip Kellman, Michael Kelly, Donald S. Lamm, Barbara Landau, Jack Nachmias, Letitia Naigles, Elissa Newport, W. Gerrod Parrott, Daniel Reisberg, Robert A. Rescorla, Paul Rozin, John Sabini, Elizabeth Shipley, Thomas F. Shipley, John C. Trueswell

 

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Page 236 - I have almost forgot the taste of fears : The time has been, my senses would have cool'd To hear a night-shriek; and my fell of hair Would at a dismal treatise rouse and stir As life were in't: I have supp'd full with horrors; Direness, familiar to my slaughterous thoughts, Cannot once start me.
Page 236 - Your face, my thane, is as a book, where men May read strange matters : — to beguile the time, Look like the time ; bear welcome in your eye, Your hand, your tongue : look like the innocent flower, But be the serpent under it.
Page 239 - That they are not a pipe for fortune's finger To sound what stop she please. Give me that man That is not passion's slave, and I will wear him In my heart's core, ay, in my heart of heart, As I do thee.
Page 235 - But man, proud man ! Drest in a little brief authority, Most ignorant of what he's most assured, His glassy essence, like an angry ape, Plays such fantastic tricks before high Heaven As make the angels weep ; who, with our spleens, Would all themselves laugh mortal.
Page 239 - I will in Cassio's lodging lose this napkin, And let him find it. Trifles light as air, Are, to the jealous, confirmations strong As proofs of holy writ.
Page 211 - ... white, sweet, milk, sugar, cat, dog." But as for mixed modes, especially the most material of them, moral words, the sounds are usually learned first ; and then, to know what complex...
Page 103 - Braver, TS, Cohen, JD, Nystrom, LE, Jonides, J., Smith, EE, & Noll, DC (1997). A parametric study of prefrontal cortex involvement in human working memory.
Page 162 - ... is to be achieved, etc.; one recognizes a resultant "good gestalt" simply by its own "inner necessity." A more detailed study at this juncture would require consideration of the following: Additions to an incomplete object (eg the segment of a...
Page 239 - As he shall smile, Othello shall go mad, And his unbookish jealousy must conster Poor Cassio's smiles, gestures, and light behaviour, Quite in the wrong.
Page 118 - Models of word segmentation in fluent maternal speech to infants. In JL Morgan & K. Demuth, (Eds.), Signal to syntax: Bootstrapping from speech to grammar in early acquisition.

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