The ESRI Guide to GIS Analysis: Geographic patterns & relationships

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ESRI, Inc., 1999 - Science - 186 pages
4 Reviews
Backed by the collective knowledge and experience of the world's leading Geographic Information Systems (GIS) company, this book presents the concepts and methods that will allow users to unleash the full analytic power of their GIS. Volume I of this two-part guide shows how to map and analyse patterns and relationships. It present the most common methods for finding where things are located, what is at a particular point and what is nearby, and how far apart they are. GIS users will learn how to find the most and the least of any quantity -- such as chemicals in the soil or traffic on a highway -- and how to monitor things that change, such as erosion or toxic spills. The pros and cons of each method of analysis are presented, as well as how to choose between different methods and how to effectively communicate the results. Topics also include how to map categories and quantities, how to classify data, and how to summarise data by geography.
 

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Just a comment : This is volume one

Review: ESRI Guide to GIS Analysis, Volume 1: Geographic Patterns and Relationships

User Review  - Faissal Bozi - Goodreads

very good book Read full review

Contents

PREFACE
5
MAPPING WHERE THINGS ARE 2 I
22
Analyzing geographic patterns
35
Making a map
56
MAPPING DENSITY
69
FINDING WHATS INSIDE
87
Selecting features inside an area
101
FINDING WHATS NEARBY I 15
115
Measuring distance or cost over a network
135
MAPPING CHANGE
149
Creating a tracking map
165
MAP AND DATA CREDITS
179
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About the author (1999)

Andy Mitchell is a technical writer with more than 20 years experience in GIS. He is the author of ""The ESRI Guide to GIS Analysis, Volume 1: Geographic Patterns and Relationships"" and ""Zeroing In"" and the coauthor of ""Getting Started with ArcGIS,"" He lives in Santa Barbara, California.

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