Tournament of Shadows: The Great Game and the Race for Empire in Central Asia

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Basic Books, Mar 17, 2009 - History - 704 pages
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From the romantic conflicts of the Victorian Great Game to the war-torn history of the region in recent decades, Tournament of Shadows traces the struggle for control of Central Asia and Tibet from the 1830s to the present. The original Great Game, the clandestine struggle between Russia and Britain for mastery of Central Asia, has long been regarded as one of the greatest geopolitical conflicts in history. Many believed that control of the vast Eurasian heartland was the key to world dominion. The original Great Game ended with the Russian Revolution, but the geopolitical struggles in Central Asia continue to the present day. In this updated edition, the authors reflect on Central Asia's history since the end of the Russo-Afghan war, and particularly in the wake of 9/11.
 

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TOURNAMENT OF SHADOWS: The Race for Empire in Central Asia and the Great Game

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

Swashbuckling tales from the history of European competition for control of Central Asia. Beginning in the 1820s, Great Britain and Czarist Russia became convinced that their fates lay in that vast ... Read full review

Tournament of Shadows: The Great Game and the Race for Empire in Central Asia

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Meyers, a former London bureau chief for the Washington Post, and television documentary producer Brysac trace the origins of the Cold War to the "first" great geopolitical rivalry in modern history ... Read full review

Contents

viii
64
PART II
171
CHAPTER TEN Mystical Imperialism
241
CHAPTER ELEVEN Emissary to the White Tsar
261
CHAPTER TWELVE Curzons Hour 283
283
CHAPTER THIRTEEN The Desert Wanderer
310
CHAPTER FOURTEEN The Spoils of Serindia
346
CHAPTER FIFTEEN The Last of
367
PART III
395
The Owl of Minerva
554
Acknowledgments
574
Bibliography
632
Photo Credits and Permissions
647
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Karl E. Meyer was London bureau chief for the Washington Post before joining the editorial board of the New York Times. He is the editor of World Policy Journal.

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