Drink Spiking and Predatory Drugging: A Modern History

Front Cover
Springer, Jul 4, 2016 - Social Science - 294 pages
0 Reviews
This book analyses common perceptions about drink-spiking, a pervasive fear for many and sometimes a troubling reality. Ideas about spiked drinks have shaped the way we think about drugs, alcohol, criminal law, risk, nightspots, and socializing for over one hundred and fifty years, since the rise of modern anaesthesia and synthetic 'pharma-ubiquity'. The book offers a wide-ranging look at the constantly shifting cultural and gender politics of 'psycho-chemical treachery'.
It provides rich case histories, assesses evolving scientific knowledge, and analyses the influence of social forces as disparate as Temperance and the acid enthusiasts of the 1960s. Drawing on interdisciplinary research, the book will be of great interest to upper-level students and scholars of criminal law, forensic science, public health, and social movements.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
Chloral and Its Sisters Synthetic Genesis and Parallel Demon
15
Good Girls Hyenas and Cheap Novel Fiends The Scourge of Chloral at the Turn of the Twentieth Century
53
Baby Its Cold War Outside An Era of PharmaUbiquity
82
A New Problem Appears in the 1990s The Birth of the Contemporary Date Rape Drugs Scare
123
Who and Where Are the Druggers?
172
What Do We Know and Not Know About Predatory Drugging?
215
Drugs Drinking College and Warding off Blame
239
Conclusion
266
Suggested Reading
283
Index
285
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2016)

Pamela Donovan is a US sociologist and criminologist. She holds PhD in Sociology from The Graduate Center, City University of New York, USA. She has taught courses in social theory, criminology, victimology, and social problems. Her previous works include No Way of Knowing: Crime, Urban Legends, and the Internet (2004).

Bibliographic information