An Historical and Descriptive Account of China: Its Ancient and Modern History, Language, Literature, Religion, Government, Industry, Manners, and Social State ...

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Oliver & Boyd, 1843 - China
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Page 153 - Sinse next repair to the place and take up the articles which they left, and having drawn out the stalks and fibres, they nicely double the leaves, make them into a circular shape, and thrust into them the fibres of the reeds. Thus three kinds of malabathrum are formed ; that from the larger leaf is called hadrosphaerum; that from the middling one, mesosphserum; that from the smaller, microsphserum.
Page 32 - Their civilization/' says Williams, " has been developed under peculiar forms and influences, and must be compared to, rather than judged of by that of Europeans ; the dissimilarity is as wide, perhaps, as can possibly exist between two races of beings having the same common nature and wants. A people...
Page 313 - ... performed by concealed actors who were quite perfect in their parts, and performed their characters to admiration. These two marine and land regiments, after separately parading in a circular procession for a considerable time, at last joined together, and forming one body, came to the front of the stage, when, after a few evolutions, they opened to the right and left to give room for the whale, who seemed to be the commanding officer, to waddle forward, and who, taking his station exactly opposite...
Page 59 - An emperor knows how to govern, when he leaves poets at liberty to make verses, the populace to act plays, historians to tell the truth, the ministers to give advice, the poor to murmur while they pay taxes, students to repeat their lessons aloud, the people to talk of news, and old men to find fault with every thing, — affairs then goon without much inconvenience.
Page 178 - In the world there is not the like, nor a place in which there are found so many pleasures, that a man would imagine himself in paradise.
Page 329 - Journal of the Proceedings of the late Embassy to China. By Henry Ellis, Esq. Secretary of Embassy, and third Commissioner.
Page 32 - ... of Europeans ; the dissimilarity is as wide, perhaps, as can possibly exist between two races of beings having the same common nature and wants. A people by whom some of the most important inventions of modern Europe were anticipated (such as the compass, porcelain, gunpowder, paper, printing), and were known and practised many centuries earlier; who probably amount to more than...
Page 8 - Tables and other works display a thorough acquaintance, not only with the scientific principles of his profession, but also with the intricate straits and channels to which he here supplies a guide. In composing the chapter for which we are indebted to him, he communicated with Captain Horsburgh, who liberally allowed the use of his valuable collections.
Page 7 - Without entering into a minute detail of facts, he has sought to exhibit tha advances made in civilization and the arts ; the most memorable events that distinguished the successive dynasties; together with a philosophical view of the causes whence originated their rise and their downfall. . He then adverts to the knowledge possessed by the Greeks and Romans relative to China ; on which subject he presumes to hope that he has thrown additional light, by tracing an early maritime route to Canton,...
Page 8 - This task has been ably performed by Captain Lynn, — an officer long employed by the Company in navigating their vessels, and afterwards as Examiner of their naval officers, and whose Nautical Tables and other works display a thorough acquaintance, not only with the scientific principles of his profession, but also with the intricate straits and channels to which he here supplies a guide.

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