The Thousand and One Nights, Commonly Called The Arabian Nights' Entertainments; Translated from the Arabic, with Copious Notes, Volume 3

Front Cover
Edward Stanley Poole
Chatto & Windus, 1865
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Contents

I
1
II
5
III
14
IV
23
V
35
VI
50
VII
61
VIII
70
XXII
234
XXIV
249
XXV
281
XXVI
283
XXVIII
343
XXIX
352
XXXI
478
XXXII
484

IX
75
X
77
XI
109
XIII
141
XIV
145
XV
168
XVII
215
XVIII
218
XIX
222
XX
226
XXI
230
XXXIV
522
XXXV
524
XXXVI
531
XXXVIII
563
XXXIX
565
XLI
586
XLII
588
XLIV
612
XLV
614
XLVI
668

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Page 44 - There is no strength nor power but in God, the High, the Great ! O God ! O our Lord ! O thou liberal of pardon ! O thou most bountiful of the most bountiful ! O God ! Amen !" They were then silent for three or four minutes ; and again recited the Fa't'hhah ; but silently.
Page 86 - ... southern region. In form it is said to resemble the eagle, but it is incomparably greater in size; being so large and strong as to seize an elephant with its talons, and to lift it into the air, from whence it lets it fall to the ground, in order that when dead it may prey upon the carcase.
Page 27 - And there is no strength nor power but in God, the High, the Great. O God, 0 our Lord, O Thou liberal of pardon, O Thou most bountiful of the most bountiful. O God. Amen.
Page 89 - ... fatigue, as well as with considerable danger from the number of snakes with which they are infested. Near the summit, it is said, there are deep valleys, full of caverns and surrounded by precipices, amongst which the diamonds are found; and here many eagles and white storks, attracted by the snakes on which they feed, are accustomed to make their nests. The persons who are in quest of the diamonds take their stand near the mouths of the caverns, and from thence cast down several pieces of flesh,...
Page 42 - They advanced to a spot there, and lifted up from it a great stone, and there appeared, beneath the place of this, a margin of stone, like the margin of a well. Into this they threw down that woman ; and lo, it was a great pit beneath the mountain. Then they brought the man, tied him beneath his bosom by a rope of fibres of the palm-tree, and let him down into the pit. They also let down to him a great jug of sweet water, and seven cakes of bread ; and when they had let him down, he loosed himself...
Page 653 - So thereupon she called out to the nurses and the eunuchs, and said to them, Bring ye my children. Accordingly they brought them to her quickly ; and they were three male children : one of them walked, and one crawled, and one was at the breast.
Page 639 - Sheykh el-Islam was silent, and feared his malice, and said to the soldiers, Verily this is an infidel, and he hath no religion nor religious opinion. Then, when the evening came, he went in to her, and saw her wearing the most magnificent of the apparel that she possessed, and adorned with the most beautiful of ornaments; and when she beheld him, she received him laughing, and said to him, A blessed night ! But hadst thou slain my father and my husband, it had been better in my opinion ! — So...
Page 179 - Thereupon we agreed with him that he should repair to Cairo in the disguise of a Jewish merchant, so that if one of us perished in the lake, he might take his mule and saddle-bags and give the bearer an hundred dinars.
Page 86 - The people of the island* report that at a certain season of the year an extraordinary kind of bird, which they call a rukh, makes its appearance from the southern region. In form it is said to resemble the eagle, but it is incomparably greater in size ; being so large and strong as to seize an elephant with its talons...
Page 44 - I beheld in that cavern many dead bodies, and their smell was putrid and abominable ; and' I blamed myself for that which I had done, saying, By Allah, I deserve all that happeneth to me and befalleth me ! I knew not night from day ; and I sustained myself with little food, not eating until hunger almost killed me, nor drinking until my thirst became violent, fearing the exhaustion of the food and water that I had with me. ' I said, There is no strength nor power but in God, the High, the Great !...

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