Fellowship of the Ring

Front Cover
Ballantine Books, May 12, 1976 - Fiction - 527 pages
44 Reviews
The fellowship of the ring tells of the fateful power of the one ring, and begins the magnificent tale of adventure which is continued in the Two Towers and in the Return of the King.

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Review: The Fellowship of the Ring (The Lord of the Rings #1)

User Review  - Anne (Anneshka) - Goodreads

CONTENT DISCLAIMER: I was feeling very muppet-y when I wrote this. Please bear with me :D This book is not for the faint-hearted. I've never known a book to come with so much baggage, I swear. So ... Read full review

Review: The Fellowship of the Ring (The Lord of the Rings #1)

User Review  - Brian - Goodreads

Update, Sixth Read 2015: I've read many authors this year and have written almost every day, so I'm growing. Having said that I must say I found a few new things about this story. I caught a few ... Read full review

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Contents

Prologue page
19
Note on the Shire Records
37
Book I
41
Copyright

22 other sections not shown

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About the author (1976)

A writer of fantasies, Tolkien, a professor of language and literature at Oxford University, was always intrigued by early English and the imaginative use of language. In his greatest story, the trilogy The Lord of the Rings (1954--56), Tolkien invented a language with vocabulary, grammar, syntax, even poetry of its own. Though readers have created various possible allegorical interpretations, Tolkien has said: "It is not about anything but itself. (Certainly it has no allegorical intentions, general, particular or topical, moral, religious or political.)" In The Adventures of Tom Bombadil (1962), Tolkien tells the story of the "master of wood, water, and hill," a jolly teller of tales and singer of songs, one of the multitude of characters in his romance, saga, epic, or fairy tales about his country of the Hobbits. Tolkien was also a formidable medieval scholar, as attested to by, among other works, Beowulf: The Monster and the Critics (1936) and his edition of Anciene Wisse:English Text of the Anciene Riwle. Hos latest work, The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrún, was never before published. It was written while Tolkien was Professor of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford during the 1920's and 1930's before The Lord of the Rings.

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