The Science of Cheese

Front Cover
OUP USA, 2014 - Science - 281 pages
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In an engaging tour of the science and history of cheese, Michael Tunick explores the art of cheese making, the science that lies underneath the deliciousness, and the history behind how humanity came up with one of its most varied and versatile of foods. Dr. Tunick spends his everyday deep within the halls of the science of cheese, as a researcher who creates new dairy products, primarily, cheeses. He takes us from the very beginning, some 8000 years ago in the Fertile Crescent, and shows us the accidental discovery of cheese when milk separated into curds and whey. This stroke of luck would lead to a very mild, and something akin to cottage, cheese-deemed delicious enough by our traveling cheese maker that he or she did it again another day. Today we know of more than 2,000 varieties of cheese from Gorgonzola, first noted in year 879, to Roquefort in 1070 to Cheddar in 1500. But Tunick delves deeper into the subject to provide a wide-ranging overview that begins with cows and milk and then covers the technical science behind creating a new cheese, milk allergies and lactose intolerance, nutrition and why cheese is a vital part of a balanced diet. The Science of Cheese is an entertaining journey through one of America's favorite foods.
 

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The Science of Cheese

User Review  - Book Verdict

The average American consumes 34 pounds of cheese annually, but most of us don't ponder the complex scientific processes involved in cheese making. In his first book, Tunick (research chemist, Dairy ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - NielsenGW - LibraryThing

Cheese has existed in some form or another since the eighth millennium BCE. Over the last ten thousand years, the technique has been the same. Separate the curd (milk solids) from the whey (remaining ... Read full review

Contents

Milk
3
Cheesemaking
21
Aging Cheese
49
4 Fresh Soft Cheeses Acids and Safety
58
5 Whey and Pickled Cheeses Amino and Fatty Acids and Salt
68
6 Stretched Curd Cheeses Alcohols and Melting
82
7 Surface Mold Cheeses Sulfur Compounds and the Senses
92
8 SmearRipened Cheeses Esters and Aroma
99
12 Cheeses with Eyes Furans Hydrocarbons and Food Pairing
139
13 Very Hard Cheeses Terpenes and Terroir
150
14 Process Cheeses and Nutrition
159
15 Analysis and Flavor Comparisons
174
16 Laws Regulations and Appellations
199
17 Do Try This at Home
229
18 The Cheese Stands Alone
239
GLOSSARY
243

9 Interior Mold Cheeses Ketones and Microbial Strains
107
10 Cheddared Cheeses Aldehydes and Texture
117
11 Washed Curd Cheeses Lactones Feed and Species
128
REFERENCES
247
INDEX
273
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About the author (2014)


Michael Tunick is a research chemist with the Dairy and Functional Foods Research Unit of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service.

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