Music Cultures of the Pacific, the Near East, and Asia

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Prentice Hall, 1996 - Music - 278 pages

The purpose of this book is to survey the basic kinds of music and musical instruments found in the major oriental civilizations and in the island cultures of the Eastern Hemisphere. It is also intended as an introduction to the basic attitudes, techniques, and nomenclature of the discipline of ethnomusicology. Presents a romanization of the book of vocal examples along with a translation or explanation of their meaning. A sonic glossary index at the end of each chapter shows all non-western terms in alphabetical order including a unique prononciation audio cassette. The inclusion of human figures in all new drawings add information about playing positions as well as instrument designs. Contains a unique cassette of pronunciations by noted and qualified speakers.

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Contents

Oceania I
1
Melanesia
14
Polynesia
23
Micronesia
32
Borneo Kalimantan
40
Bibliographical and Audiovisual Notes
60
Ethiopia
67
Bibliographical and Audiovisual Notes
103
Some Indian Folk Popular and Theatrical Music Traditions
135
Instrumental Ensembles
148
Theatrical Rural and Popular Mustc
161
East Asia
167
Bibliographical and Audiovisual Notes
201
Northeast Asia and the Island Countries
207
Epilogue
257
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

WILLIAM P. MALM, born in Illinois in 1928, received his BM (1949) and MM (1950) in composition from Northwestern University and his Ph.D. in ethnomusicology from the University of California at Los Angeles (1959). He developed an ethnomusicology program at the University of Michigan (1960-94) which
included an ensemble of nagauta and edobayashi. As director of the Stearns Collection of Musical Instruments (1980-94) he expanded its use in education and research.
Among his publications are Nagauta: The Heart of Kabuki Music (1963); Music Cultures of the Pacific, the Near East, and Asia (1966); Six Hidden Views of Japanese Music (1986); and-a joint effort-Theater as Music (1990), in which one act of a bunraku puppet play is examined.
As a teacher at Michigan he received the Henry Russel, Alumni Merit, and Legislature awards, and in 1993 he was given the Koizumi Fumio Prize in Ethnomusicology.

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