The Fountains of Paradise

Front Cover
Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1979 - Artificial satellites - 261 pages
In this, which many consider this to be Clarke's best novel, Vannevar Morgan is the greatest civil engineer of the mid-22nd century. Having built a bridge across the Straits of Gibraltar, he dreams of an even greater accomplishment, a bridge to space: a "skyhook," or "space elevator." This will be a cable stretching from the Earth's equator to an anchoring satellite in geosynchronous orbit. First Morgan must deal with the monks who own the ideal real estate, a mountaintop on the fictional island of Taprobane (a version of Clarke's adopted home of Sri Lanka, moved south so that it lies on the equator). He also has to work on the financing, solve various political problems, deal with skeptics, and finally solve some critical engineering issues and deal with the inevitable crises accompanying the actual building of the elevator.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
5
4 stars
17
3 stars
3
2 stars
0
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - antao - LibraryThing

“Because politics is the science of the possible, it only appeals to second-rate minds. The first raters only interested in the impossible” In “The Fountains of Paradise” by Arthur C. Clarke Believer ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - electrascaife - LibraryThing

An Elon Musk type wants to build a bridge from Earth to a space station and faces all sorts of challenges to make it happen. Hm. I liked the story fine, when I could find it, but there's too much time ... Read full review

Contents

Kalidasa
3
The Engineer
8
The Fountains
14
Copyright

60 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1979)

Arthur C. Clarke was born in Minehead, Somerset, England, on December 16, 1917. During World War II, he served as a radar specialist in the RAF. His first published piece of fiction was Rescue Party and appeared in Astounding Science, May 1946. He graduated from King's College in London with honors in physics and mathematics, and worked in scientific research before turning his attention to writing fiction. His first book, Prelude to Space, was published in 1951. He is best known for his book 2001: A Space Odyssey, which was later turned into a highly successful and controversial film under the direction of Stanley Kubrick. His other works include Childhood's End, Rendezvous with Rama, The Garden of Rama, The Snows of Olympus, 2010: A Space Odyssey II, 2062: Odyssey III, and 3001: The Final Odyssey. During his lifetime, he received at least three Hugo Awards and two Nebula Awards. He died of heart failure on March 19, 2008 at the age of 90.

Bibliographic information