The Native Americans

Front Cover
Indiana Historical Society, 2009 - History - 130 pages
In the second volume of the IHS Press’s Peopling Indiana Series, anthropologist Elizabeth Glenn and ethnohistorian Stewart Rafert put readers in touch with the first people to inhabit the Hoosier state, exploring what it meant historically to be an Indian in this land and discussing the resurgence of native life in the state today. Many natives either assimilated into white culture or hid their Indian identity. World War II dramatically changed this scenario when Native Americans served in the U.S. military and on the home front. Afterward, Indians from many tribal lineages flocked to Indiana to find work. Along with Indiana's Miami and Potawatomi, they are creating a diverse Indian culture that enriches the lives of all Hoosiers.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 The Original Ethnic Groups of Indiana 9500 BC1670 AD
9
2 France England and the Fur Trade 16701783
19
3 Early American Period 17831812
35
4 Statehood to Indian Removal 18121840
47
5 After Indian Removal 18401870
61
6 Tribalism Endangered 18701900
73
7 Preserving Indian Ethnicity and Tribal Identity 19001945
85
8 The Rise of Modern Tribalism and American Indian Ethnicity 1945 to the Present
97
Conclusion
109
Notes
113
Index
125
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Elizabeth Glenn was professor emerita of the Anthropology Department at Ball State University. An adjunct professor of history at the University of Delaware, Stewart Rafert and Glenn co-authored the chapter “Native Americans” in Peopling Indiana: The Ethnic Experience (Indiana Historical Society, 1996).