The works of the English poets, from Chaucer to Cowper: including the series edited with prefaces, biographical and critical

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J. Johnson, 1819 - Literary Criticism
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Page 600 - Flushed with a purple grace He shows his honest face : Now give the hautboys breath ; he comes, he comes. Bacchus, ever fair and young, Drinking joys did first ordain ; Bacchus...
Page 600 - The praise of Bacchus, then, the sweet musician sung: Of Bacchus ever fair and ever young. The jolly god in triumph comes ; Sound the trumpets, beat the drums!
Page 472 - I am as free as Nature first made man, Ere the base laws of servitude began, When wild in woods the noble savage ran.
Page 518 - Then all for women, painting, rhyming, drinking, Besides ten thousand freaks that died in thinking. Blest madman ! who could every hour employ With something new to wish or to enjoy! Railing and praising were his usual themes, And both (to show his judgment) in extremes; So over violent, or over civil, That every man, with him, was God or devil.
Page 53 - Go, lovely Rose ! Tell her, that wastes her time and me, That now she knows, When I resemble her to thee, How sweet and fair she seems to be. Tell her that's young And shuns to have her graces spied, That hadst thou sprung In deserts, where no men abide, Thou must have uncommended died. Small is the worth Of beauty from the light retired: Bid her come forth, Suffer herself to be desired, And not blush so to be admired. Then die ! that she The common fate of all things rare May read...
Page 587 - FAREWELL, too little and too lately known, Whom I began to think and call my own: For sure our souls were near allied, and thine Cast in the same poetic mould with mine. One common note on either lyre did strike, And knaves and fools we both abhorred alike.
Page 577 - Through all the realms of Nonsense absolute. This aged prince, now flourishing in peace, And blest with issue of a large increase, Worn out with business, did at length debate To settle the succession of the state; And pond'ring which of all his sons was fit To reign and wage immortal war with wit, Cried : " 'Tis resolved, for Nature pleads that he Should only rule who most resembles me.
Page 554 - My thoughtless youth was wing'd with vain desires ; My manhood long misled by wand'ring fires, Follow'd false lights ; and when their glimpse was gone, My pride struck out new sparkles of her own. Such was I, such by nature still I am ; Be thine the glory and be mine the shame. Good life be now my task : my doubts are done ; What more could shock my faith than Three in One ? " In drawing Dryden's character, Johnson has given, though I suppose unintentionally, some touches of his own.
Page 51 - ON A GIRDLE THAT which her slender waist confined, Shall now my joyful temples bind; No monarch but would give his crown His arms might do what this has done. It was my Heaven's extremest sphere, The pale which held that lovely deer; My joy, my grief, my hope, my love, Did all within this circle move. A narrow compass! and yet there Dwelt all that's good, and all that's fair; Give me but what this ribband bound, Take all the rest the sun goes round.
Page 601 - The many rend the skies with loud applause: So Love was crown'd, but Music won the cause. The prince, unable to conceal his pain, Gazed on the fair Who caused his care, And sigh'd and look'd, sigh'd and look'd, Sigh'd and look'd, and sigh'd again; At length, with love and wine at once oppress'd, The vanquish'd victor sunk upon her breast.