History of the United States of America: 1831-1847. Democrats and Whigs

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Dodd, Mead, 1917 - United States
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Contents

Discontent of South Carolina freetrade arguments
63
Bills to recharter the Bank and revise the tariff sent to
69
Van Buren rejected by Senate as minister VicePresident
75
AntiMasons in national convention Wirt for President
82
Defiance to the Union nullifying ordinance
89
Tariff reduction bill in House the force bill in Senate
96
Force bill and Clays compromise tariff passed 105 South Carolina boastfully submits hollow truce of Clay
108
SECOND ADMINISTRATION OF ANDREW JACKSON
114
Tours of Clay and Webster new era of travel
123
Early locomotives and trains accidents State charters
131
Jackson takes the responsibility paper read to the cabinet
142
Bank stands firm Biddles response condition of the Bank
148
Clay leads the assault upon the President panic session
155
Temporary distress in money market machinery of supplica
161
President refuses to yield resolutions in Congress
164
Official changes illustrious deaths
170
From distress to inflation mania for local bank charters
176
Attempt on the Presidents life
182
Section II
191
Early Whig gains State elections Presidential candidates
200
New antislavery movement the situation reviewed
206
Condition in 1831 slave insurrection in Virginia new northern
212
Antislavery riots incendiary speeches and pamphlets Garri
219
Uncertain action taken Calhoun as an alarmist
226
Arkansas and Michigan admitted local deposits sanctioned
232
Van Buren chosen President election returns and methods
238
France conforms to the treaty amicable settlement
246
Offers made to Mexico American settlers Jackson and Hous
252
Jackson cooperates resolutions in Congress
258
Distress of the poor New York fire flour riots
265
Jackson and Jefferson compared strong personal supremacy
275
Public deposits lost revenue dwindles specie circular
282
Bill lost acts for temporary relief surplus distribution post
288
New York banks lead for resumption collapse of United States
297
Antislavery petitions gagrule angry scenes in the House
303
Distribution of the patronage Clay and Webster factions
365
VicePresident Tyler summoned to the Capitol oath and
372
Speedy rivalry between Tyler and Clay aspirations for next
375
SubTreasury repealed President signs the bill
381
Whig efforts to conciliate second Bank bill agreed upon
388
Whig policy gravelled Tylers motives considered 392 The Botts letter Tylers breach with Whig party complete
394
British right of search for slaves proposal to compromise
401
Tylers breach with his party widens the axe of patronage
407
Tyler censured by the House more Presidential vetoes
413
Fruits of Whig victory lost Clays farewell to the Senate
419
Dickens in America efforts for international copyright 423 Border ruffianism antislavery agitation growing sentiment
425
Gagrule in Congress Adams and the Haverhill petition
427
A President without a party Whigs proclaim Clay for their
434
Death of Legare new cabinet changes Tyler proclaimed
440
Mexican spoliation claims aggression upon Mexico Jones
449
House elections by general ticket Presidents caveat
455
Treaty submitted discomfiture of Clay and Van Buren Presi
461
AntiTexas letters of Clay and Van Buren Whig convention
467
Exciting canvass Clay and the Liberty party explanatory
476
Adams carries repeal of gagrule triumph of personal
482
Annexation resolution passes House Senate amends by giving
488
CHAPTER XVIII
496
Distribution of offices vacancies filled
502
Convention for joint occupation Oregon in politics
508
British concessions prompt treaty defining Oregon boundary
514
Annexation leads to war Taylors military movements
522
Congress declares war American sentiment men and supplies
528
Secret instructions Commodore Sloat at Monterey and
534
Congress reassembles men and supplies voted a censorious
541
Mormon emigration from Illinois to the west of the Rocky
547
PACK
553
Index to volume tour
559
Authors final notes
565
Copyright

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Page 169 - Resolved, That the President, in the late Executive proceedings in relation to the public revenue, has assumed upon himself authority and power not conferred by the Constitution and laws, but in derogation of both.
Page 227 - I would therefore call the special attention of Congress to the subject, and respectfully suggest the propriety of passing such a law as will prohibit, under severe penalties, the circulation in the Southern States, through the mail, of incendiary publications intended to instigate the slaves to insurrection.
Page 532 - The cup of forbearance had been exhausted, even before the recent information from the frontier of the Del Norte. But now, after reiterated menaces, Mexico has passed the boundary of the United States, has invaded our territory, and shed American blood upon the American soil.
Page 305 - Sir, when I heard the gentleman lay down principles which place the murderers of Alton side by side with Otis and Hancock, with Quincy and Adams, I thought those pictured lips [pointing to the portraits in the Hall] would have broken into voice to rebuke the recreant American — the slanderer of the dead.
Page 230 - Resolved, That all petitions, memorials, resolutions, -propositions, or papers, relating in any way, or to any extent whatever, to the subject of slavery, or the abolition of slavery, shall, without being either printed or referred, be laid upon the table, and that no further action whatever shall be had thereon.
Page 227 - I must also invite your attention to the painful excitement produced in the South by attempts to circulate through the mails inflammatory appeals addressed to the passions of the slaves, in prints and in various sorts of publications, calculated to stimulate them to insurrection and to produce all the horrors of a servile war.
Page 232 - I hold the resolution to be a direct violation of the Constitution of the United States, of the rules of this House, and of the rights of my constituents.
Page 218 - ... infamy by the friends of justice and humanity throughout the world. It was a compact formed at the sacrifice of the bodies and souls of millions of our race, for the sake of achieving a political object— an unblushing and monstrous coalition to do evil that good might come. Such a compact was, in the nature of things and according to the law of God, null and void from the beginning.
Page 74 - The congress, the executive and the court, must each for itself, be guided by its own opinion of the constitution. Each public officer who takes an oath to support the constitution, swears that he will support it as he understands it, and not as it is understood by others.
Page 383 - II. — 3. you now, then, Mr. Clay, to your end of the avenue, where stands the Capitol, and there perform your duty to the country as you shall think proper. So help me God, I shall do mine at this end of it as I shall think proper.

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