The Lost King

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House of Stratus, Jan 11, 2008 - Fiction - 366 pages
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The Lost King' tells the story of Louis XVII - the French royal who officially died at the age of ten but, as legend has it, escaped to foreign lands where he lived to an old age. Sabatini breathes life into these age-old myths, creating a story of passion, revenge and betrayal. He tells of how the young child escaped to Switzerland from where he plotted his triumphant return to claim the throne of France.
 

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Contents

his Majesty
3
Jean de Batz
16
Joseph Fouché
23
The Seduction of Chaumette
31
The PuppetMaster
42
The HandCart
49
The Kidnappers
59
Farewell to Art
71
The Duke of Otranto
185
Enter the King
201
Anxieties of Monsieur de Sceaux
212
Symptoms
220
Exit Monsieur de Sceaux
234
The Impostor
242
Brother and Sister
267
The Key
284

Pursuit
79
Lake Léman
93
The Freiherr Vom Stein
105
The Heir to the Lilies
120
the Counterfeiter
131
The Errant Clockmaker
141
the KingMaker
152
Passavant
158
Pledges
172
Pauline
288
Inventions of Monsieur de Sceaux
294
Reenter Monsieur de Sceaux
304
The Dupe
310
On trial
320
Sacred Duty
328
Ave Atque Vale
340
the Man of the Circumstances
345
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About the author (2008)

Rafael Sabatini, creator of some of the world’s best-loved heroes, was born in Italy in 1875 to an English mother and Italian father, both well-known opera singers. He was educated in Portugal and Switzerland, but at seventeen moved to England, where, after a brief stint in the business world, he started to write. Fluent in a total of five languages, he nonetheless chose to write in English, claiming that 'all the best stories are written in [that language]’. His writing career was launched with a collection of short stories, followed by several novels. Fame, however, came with 'Scaramouche’, the much-loved story of the French Revolution, which became an international bestseller. 'Captain Blood’ followed soon after, which resulted in a renewed enthusiasm for his earlier work which were rushed into reprint. For many years a prolific writer, he was forced to abandon writing in the 1940’s through illness and eventually died in 1950. Sabatini is best remembered for his heroic characters and high-spirited novels, many of which have been adapted into classic films, including Scaramouche, Captain Blood and The Sea Hawk. They appeal to both a male and female audience with drama, romance and action, all placed in historical settings. It was once stated in the 'Daily Telegraph’ that 'one wonders if there is another storyteller so adroit at filling his pages with intrigue and counter-intrigue, with danger threaded with romance, with a background of lavish colour, of silks and velvets, of swords and jewels.’

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