The Cambridge Companion to Simone de Beauvoir

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Mar 10, 2003 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 336 pages
Simone de Beauvoir was a philosopher and writer of notable range and influence whose work is central to feminist theory, French existentialism, and contemporary moral and social philosophy. The essays in this volume examine the major aspects of her thought including her views on the role of biology, sexuality and sexual difference, and evil, as well as the influence on her work of Heidegger, Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, Husserl, and others, and the philosophical significance of her memoirs and fiction.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Beauvoirs place in philosophical thought
24
Reading Simone de Beauvoir with Martin Heidegger
45
The body as instrument and as expression
66
Beauvoir and MerleauPonty on ambiguity
87
Bergsons influence on Beauvoirs philosophical methodology
107
Philosophy in Beauvoirs fiction
129
Complicity and slavery in The Second Sex
149
Beauvoir and feminism interview and reflections
189
Lifestory in Beauvoirs memoirs
208
Beauvoir on the ambiguity of evil
228
Simone de Beauvoir Recounting the sexual difference
248
Beauvoir and biology a second look
266
Beauvoirs Old Age
286
Bibliography
305
Index
321

Beauvoir on Sade making sexuality into an ethic
168

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

Self and Subjectivity
Kim Atkins
No preview available - 2005

About the author (2003)

Claudia Card is Emma Goldman Professor at the Department of Philosophy, University of Wisconsin, Madison.

Claudia Card is Emma Goldman Professor at the Department of Philosophy, University of Wisconsin, Madison.