The Poetical Works of Rogers, Campbell, J. Montombery, Lamb, and Kirke White: Complete in One Volume

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J. Grigg, no. 9, N. Fourth-Street, 1836 - English poetry - 444 pages
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Page 150 - ON Linden, when the sun was low, All bloodless lay the untrodden snow, And dark as winter was the flow Of Iser, rolling rapidly. But Linden saw another sight, When the drum beat, at dead of night, Commanding fires of death to light The darkness of her scenery.
Page 149 - OF Nelson and the North Sing the glorious day's renown, When to battle fierce came forth All the might of Denmark's crown, And her arms along the deep proudly shone; By each gun the lighted brand In a bold determined hand, And the Prince of all the land Led them on.
Page 138 - There runs not a drop of my blood in the veins of any living creature. This called on me for revenge. I have sought it : I have killed many : I have fully glutted my vengeance. For my country I rejoice at the beams of peace. But do not harbor a thought that mine is the joy of fear.
Page 148 - Lo !. the death-shot of foemen outspeeding, he rode Companionless, bearing destruction abroad ; But down let him stoop from his havoc on high ! Ah ! home let him speed — for the spoiler is nigh. Why flames the far summit? Why shoot to the blast, Those embers, like stars from the firmament cast ? 'Tis the fire-shower of ruin, all dreadfully driven From his eyrie, that beacons the darkness of heaven. Oh, crested Lochiel ! the peerless in might, Whose banners arise on the battlements...
Page 261 - O'er every foe victorious, He on his throne shall rest, From age to age more glorious, All-blessing and all-blest ; The tide of time shall never His covenant remove ; His name shall stand for ever : That name to us is— Love.
Page 151 - I'll forgive your highland chief, My daughter ! — oh ! my daughter...
Page 150 - The combat deepens. On, ye brave, Who rush to glory, or the grave! Wave, Munich! all thy banners wave, And charge with all thy chivalry!
Page 17 - Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses, whatever makes the past, the distant, or the future, predominate over the present, advances us in the dignity of thinking beings. Far from me, and from my friends, be such frigid philosophy as may conduct us indifferent and unmoved over any ground which has been dignified by wisdom, bravery, or virtue. That man is little to be envied, whose patriotism would not gain force upon the plain of Marathon, or whose piety would not grow warmer among the...
Page 149 - Ye are brothers ! ye are men ! And we conquer but to save ; So peace instead of death let us bring; But yield, proud foe, thy fleet With the crews, at England's feet ; And make submission meet To our king.
Page 151 - I'll row you o'er the ferry." By this the storm grew loud apace, The water-wraith was shrieking ; And in the scowl of Heaven each face Grew dark as they were speaking. But still as wilder blew the wind, And as the night grew drearer, Adown the glen rode armed men, Their trampling sounded nearer.

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