Broadway Babies Say Goodnight: Musicals Then and Now

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Taylor & Francis, 2000 - Music - 346 pages
The glorious tradition of the Broadway musical from Irving Berlin to Jerome Kern and Rodgers and Hammerstein to Stephen Sondheim. And then . . . Cats and Les Miz. Mark Steyn's Broadway Babies Say Goodnight is a sharp-eyed view of the whole span of Broadway musical history, seven decades of brilliant achievements the best of which are among the finest works American artists have made. Show Boat, Oklahoma!, Carousel, Gypsy, and more. In an energetic blend of musical history, analysis, and backstage chat, Mark Steyn shows us the genius behind the 'simple' musical, and asks hard questions about the British invasion of Broadway and the future of the form. In this delicious book he gives us geniuses and monsters, hits and atomic bombs, and the wonderful stories that prove show business is a business which -- as the song goes --there's no business like.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - charlie68 - LibraryThing

I found the style enjoyable, but the subject matter, while familiar with some of the Broadway shows, but ignorant of most, a bit hard to digest. It is also hard to objectify something which is by nature subjective. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - KatKealy - LibraryThing

I found a couple parts of this book interesting, but mostly the author annoyed me. He seemed to dislike some things about theatre just because one is supposed to (Andrew Llyod Webber, etc.) and jumped ... Read full review

Contents

IV
13
V
22
VI
29
VII
45
VIII
62
IX
74
X
88
XI
104
XIX
196
XX
213
XXI
228
XXII
241
XXIII
254
XXIV
262
XXV
273
XXVI
287

XII
117
XIII
128
XIV
147
XV
149
XVI
161
XVII
163
XVIII
178
XXVII
305
XXVIII
307
XXIX
319
XXX
324
XXXI
326
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Mark Steyn is a columnist for Britain's Daily Telegraph and Canada's National Post. He is theatre critic of The New Criterion, North American correspondent of The Spectator, and also contributes to The Wall Street Journal and The American Spectator. A Canadian citizen, he lives in New Hampshire and Québec.

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