Global Agricultural Trade and Developing Countries

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M. Ataman Aksoy, John C. Beghin
World Bank Publications, Nov 1, 2004 - Business & Economics - 448 pages
Global Agricultural Trade and Developing Countries presents research findings based on a series of commodity studies of significant economic importance to developing countries. The book sets the stage with background chapters and investigations of cross-cutting issues. It then describes trade and domestic policy regimes affecting agricultural and food markets, and assesses the resulting patterns of production and trade. The book continues with an analysis of product standards and costs of compliance and their effects on agricultural and food trade. The book also investigates the impact of preferences given to selected countries and their effectiveness, then reviews the evidence on the attempts to decouple agricultural support from agricultural output. The last background chapter explores the robustness of the global gains of multilateral agricultural and food trade liberalization. Given this context, the book presents detailed commodity studies for coffee, cotton, dairy, fruits and vegetables, groundnuts, rice, seafood products, sugar, and wheat. These markets feature distorted policy regimes among industrial or middle-income countries. The studies analyze current policy regimes in key producing and consuming countries, document the magnitude of these distortions and estimate the distributional impacts - winners and losers - of trade and domestic policy reforms. By bringing the key issues and findings together in one place, Global Agricultural Trade and Developing Countries aids policy makers and researchers, both in their approach to global negotiations and in evaluating their domestic policies on agriculture. The book also complements the recently published Agriculture and the WTO, which focuses primarily on the agricultural issues within the context of the WTO negotiations.
 

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Global Agricultural Trade and Developing Countries presents research findings based on a series of commodity studies of significant economic importance to developing countries. The book sets the stage with background chapters and investigations of cross-cutting issues. It then describes trade and domestic policy regimes affecting agricultural and food markets, and assesses the resulting patterns of production and trade. The book continues with an analysis of product standards and costs of compliance and their effects on agricultural and food trade. The book also investigates the impact of preferences given to selected countries and their effectiveness, then reviews the evidence on the attempts to decouple agricultural support from agricultural output. The last background chapter explores the robustness of the global gains of multilateral agricultural and food trade liberalization. Given this context, the book presents detailed commodity studies for coffee, cotton, dairy, fruits and vegetables, groundnuts, rice, seafood products, sugar, and wheat. These markets feature distorted policy regimes among industrial or middle-income countries. The studies analyze current policy regimes in key producing and consuming countries, document the magnitude of these distortions and estimate the distributional impacts - winners and losers - of trade and domestic policy reforms. By bringing the key issues and findings together in one place, Global Agricultural Trade and Developing Countries aids policy makers and researchers, both in their approach to global negotiations and in evaluating their domestic policies on agriculture. The book also complements the recently published Agriculture and the WTO, which focuses primarily on the agricultural issues within the context of the WTO negotiations.
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Page 204 - An indicator of the nominal rate of assistance to producers measuring the ratio between the value of gross farm receipts including support and gross farm receipts valued at world market prices without support.
Page 204 - Estimate (PSE): an indicator of the annual monetary value of gross transfers from consumers and taxpayers to agricultural producers, measured at farm gate level, arising from policy measures which support agriculture, regardless of their nature, objectives or impacts on farm production or income.
Page 214 - It was carried out by the Joint Working Party of the Committee for Agriculture and the Trade Committee and approved by both Committees in March 1982.
Page 272 - The Nature of Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in China and Implications of WTO Accession", in Bhattasali, Deepak, Shantong Li and William J.
Page 56 - Differential and More Favorable Treatment, Reciprocity, and Fuller Participation of Developing Countries of 1979 (see GATT 1994).
Page 272 - The Doha Round of the World Trade Organization: Liberalization of Agricultural Markets and its Impact on Developing Economies.
Page 113 - Rosegrant, S. Meijer, and M. Ahmed. 2003. Fish to 2020: Supply and Demand in Changing Global Markets, Washington, DC: International Food Policy Research Institute. Fitchett, D., F. Jaspersen, G. Pfefferman, I. Karmakolias, and J. Glen. 1997. "The Private Sector and Development: Five Case Studies.
Page 76 - ... the average of the preceding 5 years. The maximum base income would be set at $4,800 net, equivalent to some $15,000 gross. 5. The right to benefits would attach to the person, not to farm land or to the farm enterprise, and would accordingly not be transferable. 6. Benefits would not be conditional upon the production of particular commodities or even upon continued employment in agriculture. 7. Benefits would be scaled downward as off-farm sources of income rose, but at the same time contingent...
Page 235 - Urban Demand for Edible Oils and Fats in China: Evidence from Household Survey Data.
Page 70 - ... most preferential trade schemes is the requirement of direct consignment or direct transport. This stipulates that goods for which preferences are requested must be shipped directly to the destination market and that if they are in transit through another country, documentary evidence may be requested to show that the goods remained under the supervision of the customs authorities of the country of transit, did not enter the domestic market there, and did not undergo operations other than unloading...

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