Ghosts of Tsavo: Stalking the Mystery Lions of East Africa

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National Geographic Books, Jun 1, 2003 - Nature - 275 pages
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"At once profound, spiritual, and witty, Master of the Three Ways is a remarkable work about human nature, the essence of life, and how to live simply and with awareness. In three hundred and fifty-seven verses, the author, Hung Ying-ming a seventeenth-century Chinese sage explores good and evil, honesty and deception, wisdom and foolishness, and heaven and hell. He draws from the wisdom of the Three Creeds Taoism, Confucianism, and Zen Buddhism to impress upon us that by combining simple elegance with the ordinary, we can make our lives artistic and poetic. This sense, along with a particular understanding of Zen that makes art from the simple in everyday life, has permeated Chinese and Japanese culture to this day. The work is divided into two books. The first generally deals with the art of living in society and the second is concerned with man's solitude and contemplations of nature. These themes repeatedly spill over into each other, creating multiple levels of meaning."
 

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The ghosts of Tsavo: stalking the mystery lions of East Africa

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

In 1898, two maneless male lions killed and devoured 135 Indian and African workers constructing a railroad bridge over the Tsavo River in Kenya. It took Lt. Col. John Henry Patterson, the engineer ... Read full review

Review: Ghosts of Tsavo: Stalking the Mystery Lions of East Africa

User Review  - Edward Sullivan - Goodreads

An interesting, sometimes gripping, mix of travelogue, science, history, and mystery in which Caputo attempts to separate reality from myth as he investigates stories of maneless, man-eating lions in East Africa. Read full review

Contents

PROLOGUE
 
ACT ONE
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

INTERMISSION
 
ACT TWO
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
EPILOGUE
 
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Philip Caputo was born on June 10, 1941 in Chicago, Illinois. He received a B.A. from Loyola University in 1964. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps from 1964 to 1967. His first book, A Rumor of War (1977), recounts his military tour of Vietnam. He has written more than fifteen books including Horn of Africa, Indian Country, Equation for Evil, Crossers, and The Longest Road. His journalism career began in 1968, when he joined the staff of the Chicago Tribune, serving as a general assignment and team investigative reporter until 1972 and then as a foreign correspondent for the next five years. In 1972 he and Hugh Jones received a Pulitzer Prize for their coverage of election fraud in the primaries. He has also written for the New York Times, Washington Post, the Boston Globe, the Los Angeles Times, and many other publications. He has worked as a screenwriter for Paramount Pictures and Michael Douglas Productions.

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