The Devil's Dictionary

Front Cover
Dover Publications, May 20, 1993 - Fiction - 139 pages
12 Reviews
Born in Ohio in 1842, journalist, short-story writer and critic Ambrose Bierce developed into one of this country's most celebrated and cynical wits - a merciless "American Swift" whose literary barbs were aimed at folly, self-delusion, politics, business, reliegion, literature and the arts. In this splendid "dictionary" of epigrams, essays, verses and vignettes, you'll find over 1,000 pointed definitions, e.g. Congratulation ("The civility of envy"), Coward ("One who in a perilous emergency thinks with his legs") and Historian ("A broad-guage gossip"). Anyone who likes to laugh will love "the Devil's Dictionary." Anyone looking for a bon mot to enliven their next speech, paper or conversation will have a field day thumbing through what H.L. Mencken called "some of the most gorgeous witticisms in the English language."

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
5
4 stars
2
3 stars
5
2 stars
0
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Fledgist - LibraryThing

The most complete version of Bierce's acerbic dictionary. This is one of the finest pieces of philosophical humour ever produced, a work of wit that certainly fulfills the original meaning of satire, a full platter. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - AntT - LibraryThing

I love this little book! Bierce really had a sly way with words. Read full review

All 6 reviews »

Other editions - View all

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1993)

Journalist, short story writer, and satirist Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914) was equally adept in a variety of genres, from ghost stories to poetry to political commentary. Bierce's fiction is particularly distinguished by its realistic depictions of the author's Civil War experiences.

Bibliographic information