Lord Palmerston

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W. Isbister, 1882 - Authors, English - 220 pages
 

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Page 136 - Weep no more, woeful shepherds, weep no more, For Lycidas, your sorrow, is not dead, Sunk though he be beneath the watery floor; So sinks the day-star in the ocean bed, And yet anon repairs his drooping head, And tricks his beams, and with new-spangled ore Flames in the forehead of the morning sky...
Page 132 - The real ground was a weak truckling to the hostile intrigues of the Orleans family, Austria, Russia, Saxony, and Bavaria, and in some degree also of the present Prussian Government. All these parties found their respective views and systems of policy thwarted by the course pursued by the British Government, and they thought that if they could remove the Minister they would change the policy. They had for a long time past effectually poisoned the mind of the Queen and the Prince...
Page 72 - I know you to be the master of, convey to him in the most friendly and unoffensive manner possible, that if France throws down the gauntlet we shall not refuse to pick it up ; and that if she begins a war, she will to a certainty lose her ships, colonies, and commerce before she sees the end of it ; that her army of Algiers will cease to give her anxiety, and that Mehemet Ali will just be chucked into the Nile.
Page 70 - The Tories have failed to make a government, not from any difference between themselves, but from a difference with the queen. They insisted on the removal of the Ladies of the Bedchamber. The queen declared she would not submit to it; that it would be too painful and affronting to her; that those ladies have no seats in Parliament; that the object in view in dismissing them was to separate her from everybody in whom she could trust, and to surround her with political spies, if not with personal...
Page 178 - Bill at the present time, has not felt it to be their duty to make some reply to the important Despatch received from the French Government, dated Paris, January 20th, 1858, and which has been laid before Parliament.
Page 64 - ... of Buenos Ayres, as they have done about almost every other matter in which we have had any communications with them, such as Spain, Portugal, Greece, Tunis, Turkey and Egypt, Persia, etc., upon all of which their language and their conduct have been directly at variance. The truth is, however reluctantly one may avow the conviction, that Louis Philippe is a man in whom no trust whatever can be reposed. However, there he is, and we call him our ally...
Page 16 - Of course one's vanity and ambition would lead one to accept the brilliant offer first proposed ; but it is throwing for a great stake, and where much is to be gained, very much also may be lost. I have always thought it unfortunate for any one, and particularly a young man, to be put above his proper level, as he only rises to fall the lower.
Page 140 - It gives me pleasure to be enabled, by the blessing of Providence, to congratulate you on the generally improved condition of the country, and especially of the industrious classes. If you should be of opinion that recent legislation, in contributing, with other causes, to this happy result, has at the same time inflicted unavoidable injury on certain important interests, I recommend you dispassionately to consider how far it may be practicable equitably to mitigate that injury, and to enable the...
Page 16 - You will see by this day's paper that I was tempted by some evil spirit to make a fool of myself for the entertainment of the House last night; however, I thought it was a good opportunity of breaking the ice, although one should flounder a little in doing so, as it was impossible to talk any very egregious nonsense upon so good a cause.
Page 117 - No, sir, let it not be so ; let us recognize, and recognize with frankness, the equality of the weak with the strong ; the principles of brotherhood among nations, and of their sacred independence.

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