An Encyclopędia Of Gardening: Comprising The Theory And Practice Of Horticulture, Floriculture, Arboriculture, And Landscape-Gardening, Including All the Latest Improvements ; A General History Of Gardening In All Coutries; And A Statistical View Of Its Present State ; With Suggestions For Its Future Progress, In The British Isles

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Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, Green, and Longman, 1835 - Arboriculture - 1270 pages
 

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این یک کتاب بسیارمفید برای تمام کسانی است که علوم باغبانی را خوانده وخواهان معلومات بیشتردرین زمینه می باشد است .

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Page 321 - At that moment appeared Kent, painter enough to taste the charms of landscape, bold and opinionative enough to dare and to dictate, and born with a genius to strike out a great system from the twilight of imperfect essays.
Page 310 - King Henry VIII. for his pleasure and retirement, and built by him with an excess of magnificence and elegance, even to ostentation ; one would imagine every thing that architecture...
Page 14 - God Almighty first planted a garden; and, indeed, it is the purest of human pleasures. It is the greatest refreshment to the spirits of man; without which buildings and palaces are but gross...
Page 467 - ... matter, which mixes with the earthy materials of the rock ; in this improved soil more perfect plants are capable of subsisting ; these in their turn absorb nourishment from water and the atmosphere; and after perishing, afford new materials to those already provided : the decomposition of the rock still continues ; and at length by such slow and gradual processes, a soil...
Page 374 - ... were elegant and beautiful damsels, accomplished in the arts of singing, playing upon all sorts of musical instruments, dancing, and especially those of dalliance and amorous allurement. Clothed in rich dresses they were seen continually sporting and amusing themselves in the garden and pavilions; their female guardians being confined within doors, and never suffered to appear. The object which the chief had in view in forming a garden of this fascinating kind, was this: that Mahomet having promised...
Page v - Engravings, 7s. 6d. cloth, LOUDON.-AN ENCYCLOPEDIA OF GARDENING; Presenting, in one systematic view, the History and Present State of Gardening in all Countries, and its Theory and Practice in Great Britain : with the Management of the Kitchen Garden, the Flower Garden, Laying-out Grounds, &c. By JC LOUDON, FLS &c. A New Edition, enlarged and improved. 8vo. with nearly 1,000 Engravings on Wood, 50s. cloth. LOUDON.-AN ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TREES AND SHRUBS; being the " Arboretum et Fruticetum Britannicum...
Page 375 - Badakhshan and Bokhara. It is on an elevated site, enjoys running water, and the climate in the winter season is temperate. In the garden there is a small hillock, from which a stream of water, sufficient to drive a mill, incessantly flows into the garden below. The four-fold field-plot of this garden is situated on this eminence.
Page 374 - ... by a secret passage. At his court, likewise, this chief entertained a number of youths, from the age of twelve to twenty years, selected from the inhabitants of the surrounding mountains, who showed a disposition for martial exercises, and appeared to possess the quality of daring courage. To them he was in the daily practice of discoursing on the subject of the Paradise announced by the prophet, and of his own power of granting...
Page 497 - On the other hand; a difference in temperature, of some magnitude, was always observed on still and serene nights, between bodies sheltered from the sky by substances touching them, and similar bodies, which were sheltered by a substance a little above them. I found, for example, upon one night, that the warmth of grass, sheltered by a cambric handkerchief raised a few inches in the air, was 3°...
Page 509 - I suppose some great heat and rarefaction of the air in or about the Gulf of Mexico ; the air thence rising has its place supplied by the next more northern, cooler, and therefore denser and heavier, air ; that, being in motion, is followed by the next more northern air, &c. &,c., in a successive current, to which current our coast and inland ridge of mountains give the direction of northeast, as they lie northeast and southwest.

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