The Scots Magazine, Volume 39

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Sands, Brymer, Murray and Cochran, 1777 - English literature
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Page 23 - We are offered, by the terms of this sale, six months' credit; and that perhaps has induced some of us to attend it, because we cannot spare the ready money, and hope now to be fine without it. But, ah, think what you do when you run in debt; you give to another power over your liberty. If you cannot pay at the time, you will be ashamed to see your creditor; you will be in fear when you speak to him, you will make poor pitiful sneaking excuses, and by degrees come to lose your veracity, and sink...
Page 23 - Poor Richard tells us, have better memories than debtors; and in another place says, creditors are a superstitious sect, great observers of set days and times. The day comes round before you are aware, and the demand is made before you are prepared to satisfy it; or if you bear your debt in mind, the term which at first seemed so long, will, as it lessens, appear extremely short.
Page 21 - The cat in gloves catches no mice, as Poor Richard says. It is true there is much to be done, and perhaps you are weak-handed; but stick to it steadily, and you will see great effects; for, Constant dropping wears away stones; and, By diligence and patience the mouse ate in two the cable; and Little strokes fell great oaks...
Page 21 - If you would be wealthy, says he in another Almanack, think of Saving as well as of Getting: The Indies have not made Spain rich, because her Outgoes are greater than her Incomes.
Page 4 - I thought I might say to him, ' Good Charon, I have been correcting my works for a new edition. Allow me a little time that I may see how the public receives the alterations.
Page 4 - Colonel Edmonstone soon afterwards came to see him, and take leave of him; and on his way home he could not forbear writing him a letter, bidding him once more an eternal adieu, and applying to him, as to a dying man, the beautiful French...
Page 2 - I retired to my native country of Scotland, determined never more to' set my foot out of it; and retaining the satisfaction of never having preferred a request to one great man, or, even making advances of friendship to any of them.
Page 377 - You shall be taken from the place where you are, and be carried to the place from whence you came, and from thence to the place of execution, and there be severally hanged by your necks until you be dead. And the Lord have mercy on your souls.
Page 19 - Brother Authors in the same Way, for what Reason I know not, have ever been very sparing in their Applauses, and no other Author has taken the least Notice of me, so that did not my Writings produce me some solid Pudding, the great Deficiency of Praise would have quite discouraged me. I...
Page 20 - What though you have found no Treasure, nor has any rich Relation left you a Legacy, Diligence is the Mother of Good-luck, as Poor Richard says, and God gives all Things to Industry. Then Plough deep, while Sluggards sleep, and you shall have Corn to sell and to keep, says Poor Dick.

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