Poor Richard's Almanack

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Barnes & Noble Publishing, Jan 1, 2004 - Almanacs, American - 302 pages
49 Reviews
Poor Richard's Almanack is one of Benjamin Franklin's most charming creations. He delighted in cloaking his writing behind a variety of literary personas, and Richard Saunders remains one of his most beloved. Some critics have complained that Poor Richard reveals the shallow materialism at the heart of Franklin's homespun philosophy and, by extension, at the heart of America itself. Even so, Almanack holds a central place in understanding Franklin and his evolution from humble tradesman to founding father as well as providing a window into colonial America. Franklin's sharp wit still retains its ability to surprise and delight readers today.
 

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Review: Poor Richard's Almanack

User Review  - Carolee - Goodreads

I did not finish. I couldn't keep at pages and pages of quotes, snippets, and poems, no matter how charming and wise. My failing, not Franklin's. It is a beautiful book with thick, creamy paper and intricate illustrations of good imprint and color by Rockwell. Read full review

Review: Poor Richard's Almanack

User Review  - Bill - Goodreads

Very witty and many sayings are still timely. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

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SUGGESTED READING
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Copyright

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About the author (2004)

One of 17 children, Benjamin Franklin was born in Boston on January 17, 1706. He ended his formal education at the age of 10 and began working as an apprentice at a newspaper. Running away to Philadelphia at 17, he worked for a printer, later opening his own print shop. Franklin was a man of many talents and interests. As a writer, he published a colonial newspaper and the well-known Poor Richard's Almanack, which contains his famous maxims. He authored many political and economic works, such as The Way To Wealth and Journal of the Negotiations for Peace. He is responsible for many inventions, including the Franklin stove and bifocal eyeglasses. He conducted scientific experiments, proving in one of his most famous ones that lightning and electricity were the same. As a politically active citizen, he helped draft the Declaration of Independence and lobbied for the adoption of the U.S. Constitution. He also served as ambassador to France. He died in April of 1790 at the age of 84.

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