The History of Prussia, from the Times of the Knights of the Cross and Sword to the Occupation of Hanover, 1867. Compiled from the Best Authorities, by M. A. D.

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Whittaker & Company, 1869 - 183 pages
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Page 148 - My dear Wife,— You well know what I promised you, and I have kept my word. Superiority of numbers forced me to give way on the 17th ; but, on the 18th, in conjunction with my friend Wellington, I put an end at once to Buonaparte's dancing.
Page 43 - I have in my stable a parcel of old mules, who have served me a long while, but I have not yet found any of them apply to be made Superintendents of the Stable. The army is not a public house where people may run in and out as they please. Since this man has once left the service, he can have no ambition, and I hate such officers. We have enough of...
Page 78 - ... to the dreadful amount of consumption. It is quite horrible how far the consumption of coffee goes — to say nothing of other articles ! The reason is, that every peasant and common fellow is accustoming himself to the use of coffee, as being now so easily procured in the open country. If this be a little bit checked, the people must take again to beer, and that is surely for the good of their own breweries, as more beer would then be sold. Here then is the object — that so much money may...
Page 44 - Project from Colonel von W., for obtaining, without any fresh burden on the people, a million and a half additional revenue. 38. Petition from the academician Bitaube, who is writing the History of Holland, for six months' leave of absence to travel in that country.
Page 43 - That would be appointing a goat for gardener ! Fie ! how can he propose such a thing ? I shall send him no money to help his writing. He already writes his fingers off. Let him write me what is really needful, and not so much useless stuff that gives me no information. Carlsbad can do nothing for one's ears. After Hussars have taken wives, they are seldom worth a shot of powder. But if he (Colonel von Lossow) believes that those gentlemen would still do their duty well, I will give them leave.
Page 20 - ... Prussia dressed in a plain dark blue uniform with red facings, his head ornamented with a small bobwig instead of a French perruque, his sword by his side, and a stout cane in his hand, abusing the courtiers for " spitting and spluttering " French in his face. " I am no Frenchman," he used to say, " I don't want to be a Frenchman — German is good enough for me.— As soon as my children are born I will place a sword and pistol in their cradles, that they may learn betimes to drive these intruding...
Page 78 - Royal Rescript of August 27, 1779:— " The great point," says that Rescript (which is written in the style of familiar conversation), " is to put some limits to the dreadful amount of consumption. It is quite horrible how far the consumption of coffee goes — to say nothing of other articles ! The reason is, that every peasant and common fellow is accustoming himself to the use of coffee, as being now so easily procured in the open country. If this be a little bit checked, the people must take...
Page 43 - APPENDIX. other losses he suffered at the bombardment of Custrin. 28. Petition from the Ober-Auditor G. at Berlin, complaining of the appointment of Ober- Auditor Reinecke as General- Auditor, and stating his own claims as the senior of all the OberAuditors, and as having served the state for thirty years. 29. Petition from Captain von E...
Page 22 - The messenger was Frederick himself. The great object of Frederick's life, to which all his other plans were in some degree subservient, was the raising and disciplining a military force powerful enough not only to protect Prussia against foreign aggression, but to obtain for her an influential position...
Page 43 - ... the Prussian army, with the view that the stricter discipline may wean him from his drunken habits. 17. Petition from the merchant Hintze for permission to import 10,000 cwt. of copper, duty free. 18. Petition from the apprentice-mason Eichel for admission to the rights of master-mason at Berlin. 19. Petition from the Jew Meyer Benjamin at Magdeburg, for admission to equal privileges with Christian tradesmen.

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