The Reflexive Thesis: Wrighting Sociology of Scientific Knowledge

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University of Chicago Press, Aug 2, 1989 - Philosophy - 287 pages
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This unusually innovative book treats reflexivity, not as a philosophical conundrum, but as a practical issue that arises in the course of scholarly research and argument. In order to demonstrate the concrete and consequential nature of reflexivity, Malcolm Ashmore concentrates on an area in which reflexive "problems" are acute: the sociology of scientific knowledge. At the forefront of recent radical changes in our understanding of science, this increasingly influential mode of analysis specializes in rigorous deconstructions of the research practices and textual products of the scientific enterprise. Through a series of detailed examinations of the practices and products of the sociology of scientific knowledge, Ashmore turns its own claims and findings back onto itself and opens up a whole new era of exploration beyond the common fear of reflexive self-destruction.
 

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Contents

CHAPTER
1
CHAPTER
26
ATTENDING TO TERMINOLOGY
30
BARTHES
36
DISCOURSE ANALYSIS
46
GOULDNER
52
LAUDAN
61
REFLEXIVE MOMENTS AND MENTIONS
74
The Life and Opinions
112
THE REPLICATIONCANDIDACY OF THE SIX STAGES
136
CHAPTER
169
FIRST TEXT
175
CHAPTER SEVEN
194
APPENDIX
221
Notes
227
Bibliography
251

SOCIOLOGY
77
S WOOLGAR
83

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About the author (1989)

Malcolm Ashmore is a lecturer in sociology at Manchester Polytechnic.

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