Collateral Damage: The Psychological Consequences of America's War on Terrorism

Front Cover
Paul R. Kimmel, Chris E. Stout
Greenwood Publishing Group, 2006 - Political Science - 222 pages

Color-coded terrorism alerts are issued, then lifted with no explanation. False alarms can, like crying wolf, desensitize people to a real need to be on alert. And that psychic numbing is just one effect discussed in this book by fifteen psychologists teamed up to take a critical look at the U.S. war on terrorism. These experts are led by the Chairman of an American Psychological Association task force charged with pinpointing the effect of our anti-terrorism efforts on American mental health. Together, they present the most up-to-date and intriguing picture we have of the fallout on our own people from our own programs. The text spotlights stereotyping of foreigners, increased domestic hate crimes, fear, depression and helplessness, as well as increased militancy and belligerence, especially among students. Perhaps most disturbing in the land of the free, we also see increasing acceptance of restrictions on our personal freedoms, and acceptance of human rights violations.

Color-coded terrorism alerts are issued, then lifted with no explanation. False alarms can, like crying wolf, desensitize people to a real need to be on alert. And that psychic numbing is just one effect discussed in this book by fifteen psychologists teamed up for a critical look at the U.S. war on terrorism. These experts are led by the Chairman of the American Psychological Association task force charged with pinpointing the effect of our anti-terrorism efforts on America's mental health. Together, they present the most up-to-date and intriguing picture we have of the fallout on our own people from our own programs. The text spotlights fueled stereotyping of foreigners, increased domestic hate crimes, fear, depression and helplessness, as well as increasing militancy and belligerence, especially among students. Perhaps most disturbing in the land of the free, our attention is drawn to growing acceptance of restrictions on our personal freedoms, and acceptance of human rights violations.

Contributors to this collection aim to give us a reality check, looking at what our national reactions to terrorism have been, how those reactions have affected the psyche of our people and whether this has made us stronger or weaker, and more or less likely to be the target for future attacks.

 

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Contents

An Analysis of Conditions Ripe for Hate Crimes
19
Terrorism and Responses toTerrorism
45
Negative Reactions to Antiwar Views in the United States
67
Threat Ideologyand Political Behavior
79
chapter 6 Perceptions of Threat National Representationand Support for Procedures To Protect the National Group
109
Impact onImmigrant Groups
131
A PostmodernHumanistic Perspective
145
Preliminary Research in Afghanistan and Iraq
165
Public Mental Health in the Age of Terrorism
189
Afterword by Chris E Stout
205
Index
209
About the Series Advisory Board
213
About the Editors and Contributors
217
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Paul R. Kimmel is Chair of the American Psychological Association's Task Force on the Psychological Effects of Efforts to Prevent Terrorism. He is past President of Psychologists for Social Responsibility, and an Adjunct Faculty member at the Saybrook Graduate School and Research Center.

Chris E. Stout is Series Editor for the Praeger series, Contemporary Psychology. Stout is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist and a Clinical Full Professor at the University of Illinois College of Medicine's Department of Psychiatry. He served as NGO Special Representative to the United Nations and is a Founding Director of the Center for Global Initiatives. He has published some 300 papers and 30 books and manuals on psychology and his works have been translated into six languages.

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