The American Quarterly Review, Volume 7

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Carey, Lea & Carey, 1830 - American literature
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Page 363 - Statesman, yet friend to truth ! of soul sincere, In action faithful, and in honour clear ; Who broke no promise, served no private end, Who gain'd no title, and who lost no friend ; Ennobled by himself, by all approved, And praised, unenvied, by the muse he loved,
Page 122 - The purposes for which men enter into society will determine the nature and terms of the social compact ; and as they are the foundation of the legislative power, they will decide what are the proper objects of it : The nature, and ends of legislative power will limit the exercise of it.
Page 125 - The government of the United States has been emphatically termed a government of laws, and not of men. It will certainly cease to deserve this high appellation, if the laws furnish no remedy for the violation of a vested legal right.
Page 133 - The correctness of this principle, so far as respects general legislation, can never be controverted But, if an act be done under a law, a succeeding legislature cannot undo it. The past cannot be recalled by the most absolute power.
Page 134 - State in which a decision in the suit could be had, where is drawn in question the validity of a treaty or statute of, or an authority exercised under the United States, and the decision is against their validity; or where is drawn in question the validity of a statute of, or an authority exercised under any State, on the ground of their being repugnant to the constitution, treaties or laws of the United States...
Page 125 - The very essence of civil liberty certainly consists in the right of every individual to claim the protection of the laws, whenever he receives an injury.
Page 122 - I cannot subscribe to the omnipotence of a State Legislature, or that it is absolute and without control ; although its authority should not be expressly restrained by the Constitution, or fundamental law of the State. The people of the United States erected their Constitutions, or forms of government, to establish justice, to promote the general welfare, to secure the blessings of liberty; and to protect their persons and property from violence.
Page 14 - Behold, whiles she before the altar stands, Hearing the holy priest that to her speaks And blesses her with his two happy hands...
Page 134 - That a final judgment or decree in any suit, in the highest court of law or equity of a State in which a decision in the suit could be had...
Page 135 - But it must be decided peacefully or remain a source of hostile legislation, perhaps of hostility of a still more serious nature; and if it is to be so decided, by this tribunal alone can the decision be made. On the supreme court of the United States has the Constitution of our country devolved this important duty.

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