Practical Politics, Or, the Liberalism of To-day

Front Cover
T. Fisher Unwin, 1888 - Great Britain - 224 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 43 - If all mankind, minus one, were of one opinion, and only one person were of the contrary opinion, mankind would be no more justified in silencing that one person than he, if he had the power, would be justified in silencing mankind.
Page 135 - TAXES upon every article which enters into the mouth, or covers the back, or is placed under the foot — taxes upon...
Page 117 - Suppose that there is a kind of income which constantly tends to increase, without any exertion or sacrifice on the part of the owners: those owners constituting a class in the community, whom the natural course of things progressively enriches, consistently with complete passiveness on their own part.
Page 44 - A government in every country should be just like a corporation; and, in this country, it is made up of the landed interest, which alone has a right to be represented ; as for the rabble, who have nothing but personal property, what hold has the nation of them ? What security for the payment of their taxes ? They may pack up all their property on their backs, and leave the country in the twinkling of an eye, but landed property cannot be removed.
Page 11 - tis not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a church door ; but 'tis enough, 'twill serve : ask for me to-morrow, and you shall find me a grave man. I am peppered, I warrant, for this world. A plague o...
Page 135 - The school-boy whips his taxed top — the beardless youth manages his taxed horse, with a taxed bridle, on a taxed road: — and the dying Englishman, pouring his medicine, which has paid 7 per cent, into a spoon that has paid 15 per cent — flings himself back upon his chintz bed, which has paid 22 per cent. — and expires in the arms of an apothecary who has paid a license of a hundred pounds for the privilege of putting him to death.
Page 200 - But, indeed, the dictum that truth always triumphs over persecution, is one of those pleasant falsehoods which men repeat after one another till they pass into commonplaces, but which all experience refutes.
Page 95 - Should the Government and the Country so far forget their God as to cast off the Church, to deprive it of its temporal honours and substance, on what will you rest the claim of respect and attention which you make upon your flocks? Hitherto you have been upheld by your birth, your education, your wealth, your connexions; should these secular advantages cease, on what must Christ's Ministers depend?
Page 135 - The schoolboy whips his taxed top ; the beardless youth manages his taxed horse with a taxed bridle on a taxed road ; and the dying Englishman, pouring his medicine, which has paid seven per cent., into a spoon that has paid fifteen per cent., flings himself back upon his chintz bed which has paid twenty-two per cent., makes his will on an...
Page 28 - ... that their maxims have a plausible air; and, on a cursory view, appear equal to first principles. They are light and portable. They are as current as copper coin ; and about as valuable. They serve equally the first capacities and the lowest ; and they are, at least, as useful to the •worst men as the best. Of this stamp is the cant of Not men but measures ; a sort of charm, by which many people get loose from every honourable engagement.

Bibliographic information