The Compleat Angler, Or the Contemplative Man's Recreation

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Coachwhip Publications, Apr 1, 2005 - Nature - 208 pages
24 Reviews
Walton's popular classic treatise on fishing goes far beyond techniques, as it embraces a life that values serenity and appreciation for creation. Some of the natural history lore is antiquated, but keen intelligence and good humor express themselves in a readable and enjoyable manner.
  

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Review: The Compleat Angler, or the Contemplative Man's Recreation

User Review  - Maurice Halton - Goodreads

This is not a book for anglers; it's a book for Englishmen. It should be subtitled 'how an English gentleman behaves - in metaphor'. A book about fishing? Come on! Whoever gave this classic less than five stars needs something. Read full review

Review: The Compleat Angler, or the Contemplative Man's Recreation

User Review  - Maurice Halton - Goodreads

This is not a book for anglers; it's a book for Englishmen. It should be subtitled 'how an English gentleman behaves - in metaphor'. A book about fishing? Come on! Whoever gave this classic less than five stars needs something. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Dedication
7
A Conference Betwixt an Angler a Hunter and a Falconer Each Commending His Recreation
9
Observations of the Otter and Chub
35
How to Fish For and to Dress the Chavender or Chub
41
Observations of the Nature and Breeding of the Trout and How to Fish for Him And the MilkMaids Song
45
More Directions How to Fish for and How to Make for the Trout an Artificial Minnow and Flies With Some Merriment
54
Observations of the Umber or Grayling and Directions How to Fish for Them
82
Observations of the Salmon With Directions How to Fish for Him
84
Of Roach and Dace and How to Fish for Them And of Cadis
131
Of the Minnow or Penk of the Loach and of the BullHead or MillersThumb
138
Of Several Rivers and Some Observations of Fish
141
Of FishPonds and How to Order Them
144
Directions for Making of a Line and for the Colouring of Both Rod and Line
147
Chapter I
157
Chapter II
163
Chapter III
169

Observations of the Luce or Pike With Directions How to Fish for Him
89
Observations of the Carp With Directions How to Fish for Him
97
Observations of the Bream and Directions to Catch Him
103
Observations of the Tench and Advice How to Angle for Him
108
Observations of the Pearch and Directions How to Fish for Him
110
Observations of the Eel and Other Fish that Want Scales and How to Fish for Them
114
Observations of the Barbel and Directions How to Fish for Him
119
Observations of the Gudgeon the Ruffe and the Bleak and How to Fish for Them
122
Is of Nothing Or That Which is Nothing Worth
124
Chapter IV
172
Chapter VI
178
Chapter VII
183
Chapter VIII
192
Chapter IX
197
Chapter X
198
Chapter XI
200
Chapter XII
205
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Izaak Walton (c. 1594 - 15 December 1683) was an English writer. Best known as the author of The Compleat Angler, he also wrote a number of short biographies that have been collected under the title of Walton's Lives. Walton was born at Stafford, c. 1594; the traditional '9 August 1593' date is based on a misinterpretation of his will, which he began on 9 August 1683. The register of his baptism gives his father's name as Gervase. His father, who was an innkeeper as well as a landlord of a tavern, died before Izaak was three. His mother then married another innkeeper by the name of Bourne, who would later run the Swan in Stafford. He settled in London where he began trading as an ironmonger in a small shop in the upper story of Thomas Gresham's Royal Burse or Exchange in Cornhill. In 1614 he had a shop in Fleet Street, two doors west of Chancery Lane in the parish of St Dunstan's. He became verger and churchwarden of the church, and a friend of the vicar, John Donne. He joined the Ironmongers' Company in November 1618. Walton's first wife was Rachel Floud (married December 1626), a great-great-niece of Archbishop Cranmer. She died in 1640. He soon remarried, to Anne Ken (1646-1662), who appears as the pastoral Kenna of The Angler's Wish; she was a stepsister of Thomas Ken, afterwards bishop of Bath and Wells.

THE LIFE OF MONTAIGNE The author of the Essays was born, as he informs us himself, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day, the last of February 1533, at the chateau of St. Michel de Montaigne. His father, Pierre Eyquem, esquire, was successively first Jurat of the town of Bordeaux (1530), Under-Mayor 1536, Jurat for the second time in 1540, Procureur in 1546, and at length Mayor from 1553 to 1556. He was a man of austere probity, who had "a particular regard for honour and for propriety in his person and attire . . . a mighty good faith in his speech, and a conscience and a religious feeling inclining to superstition, rather than to the other extreme. Between 1556 and 1563 an important incident occurred in the life of Montaigne, in the commencement of his romantic friendship with Etienne de la Boetie, whom he had met, as he tells us, by pure chance at some festive celebration in the town. From their very first interview the two found themselves drawn irresistibly close to one another, and during six years this alliance was foremost in the heart of Montaigne, as it was afterwards in his memory, when death had severed it.

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