History of England from the Accession of James I. to the Outbreak of the Civil War, 1603-1642, Volume 8

Front Cover
Longmans, Green, and Company, 1909 - Great Britain
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 243 - Enow of such, as for their bellies' sake Creep and intrude and climb into the fold ! Of other care they little reckoning make Than how to scramble at the shearers' feast, And shove away the worthy bidden guest.
Page 251 - That to the faithful herdman's art belongs ! What recks it them ? What need they ? they are sped ; And when they list, their lean and flashy songs Grate on their scrannel pipes of wretched straw, The hungry sheep look up, and are not fed, But swoln with wind and the rank mist they draw, Rot inwardly, and foul contagion spread : Besides what the grim wolf with privy paw Daily devours apace, and nothing said, But that two-handed engine at the door Stands ready to smite once, and smite no more.
Page 284 - The law knows . no such king-yoking policy. The law is of itself an old and trusty servant of the King's; it is his instrument or means which he useth to govern his people by. I never read nor heard that lex was Rex; but it is common and most true that Rex is lex...
Page 241 - He was a very fine gentleman, active, and full of courage, and most accomplished in those qualities of horsemanship, dancing, and fencing, which accompany a good breeding; in which his delight was. Besides that he was amorous in poetry and music, to which he indulged the greatest part of his time; and nothing could...
Page 206 - ... and by law compel the doing thereof, in case of refusal or refractoriness ? And whether, in such case, is not the king the sole judge both of the danger, and when and how the same is to be prevented and avoided...
Page 269 - God ; this deifying our own interpretations and tyrannous enforcing them upon others ; this restraining of the word of God from that latitude and generality, and the understandings of men from that liberty wherein Christ and the apostles left them, is and hath been the only fountain of all the schisms of the church, and that which makes them immortal...
Page 29 - I am confident that the king, being pleased to set himself in the business, is able, by his wisdom and ministers, to carry any just and honourable action...
Page 263 - London ; who all found their lodgings there as ready as in the colleges ; nor did the lord of the house know of their coming or going, nor who were in his house, till he came to dinner or supper where all still met. Otherwise there was no troublesome ceremony or constraint, to forbid men to come to the house, or to make them weary of staying there. So that many came thither to study in a better air, finding all the books they could desire in his library, and all the persons together whose company...
Page 241 - He loved monarchy, as it was the foundation and support of his own greatness; and the church, as it was well constituted for the splendour and security of the crown ; and religion, as it cherished and maintained that order and obedience that was necessary to both...
Page 140 - I pray God bless him to carry it so that the Church may have honour, and the State service and content by it. And now, if the Church will not hold up themselves, under God I can do no more.

Bibliographic information