White Fang

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Grosset & Dunlap, 1906 - Alaska - 327 pages
12 Reviews
In the desolate, frozen wilds of north-west Canada, a wolf-cub soon finds himself the sole survivor of the litter. Son of Kiche - half-wolf, half-dog - and the ageing wolf One Eye, he is thrust into a savage world where each day becomes a fight to stay alive.
 

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I think the author is great with his use of words, but I found a grammar mistake, not within the quotes, and since I am eleven I am having a harder time understanding the BIG vocabulary words. Other than that, I find the book so detailed its like watching it as a movie! I would strongly recommend this book. Additionally, I need to read a dictionary.  

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White Fang was written by Jack London and was published in 1906. It is about a wolf named White Fang. He has to learn how to survive in the wild and in captivity. In this remarkable story, Jack London does a marvelous job of portraying the life of this wolf. Throughout his life, he faces many hardships. When a stranger shows him love and compassion, he realizes that that is what he really wants.
Two men are delivering a body in the far north when they realize that their sled dogs are disappearing. They realize that the dogs are being tricked by a female wolf (who is actually half-wolf half-dog). The dogs are picked off one by one, along with one of the men. Help comes just in time to save the other man. Not long after he is rescued, it is time for the wolves to mate.
White Fang is born to the she-wolf and another wolf named One-Eye. He learns how to survive in the wild with the help of his mother. She protects him. She even brings him food when he is unable to get it on his own. As he grows, he learns how to fend for himself. He learns how to hunt. At one point, he learns how to fight when he and his mother are attacked by a lynx.
While he is still a pup, he and his mother are taken by a tribe of Native Americans that she once belonged to. It is while he is with the Native Americans that he really learns how to stand his ground. One of the other dogs, whose name is Lip-Lip, is always trying to attack him. White Fang is eventually able to whip every dog in the tribe except for Lip-Lip. As they grow older, the two dogs eventually leave the tribe and White Fang kills Lip-Lip.
As time goes on, White Fang meets back up with the Native Americans. They are living by the Yukon. As white men enter the area, one man, known as Beauty Smith, notices White Fang. He notices all of his capabilities, especially fighting (and beating) other dogs. He gives Gray Beaver, White Fang’s master, some whiskey. Eventually, Gray beaver trades White Fang for more whiskey.
Beauty Smith enters White Fang in several dog fights. He finally meets his match with a bulldog. Left for dead by Beauty Smith, White Fang is rescued by a man named Weedon Scott. Scott takes good care of him. He tames this wolf and take him home to live with him in California. There, White Fang learns to love people like Scott and his family.
While everyone is sleeping one night, a stranger breaks into the house. He was an escaped convict who was trying to kill Weedon Scott’s father. White Fang attacks the man, saving Scott’s father, but getting severely injured in the process. He eventually heals and learns that he has had puppies with one of the master’s dogs named Collie. He stays in California with Scott and is finally happy.
In this book, as I stated before, Jack London does a very good job at portraying the life and feelings of this wolf called White Fang. White Fang is a book that illustrates high moral standards through man and beast. Jack London shows through Weedon Scott that all animals, whether wild or domesticated, need to be treated with love and kindness. This book does a marvelous job at portraying courage and survival through multiple characters such as White Fang and also Henry, the man who was rescued before White Fang was born.
This book also shows how important friendships can be. Scott and White Fang had a great friendship. Because of this friendship, Scott’s father was saved from a criminal. White Fang was also able to have puppies because Weedon Scott had another dog. He also learned what love was because of this friendship.
In my opinion, White Fang is a great story. It not only provides great entertainment, but also high moral standards. It also shows how courage plays a vital role in survival. Last of all, it shows the importance of true friendship. I would highly recommend this book to anyone. To conclude, this book is a great example of classic, American literature.
 

Selected pages

Contents

I
3
II
15
III
30
IV
49
V
64
VI
76
VII
84
VIII
101
XIV
171
XV
187
XVI
202
XVII
215
XVIII
223
XIX
240
XX
249
XXI
271

IX
113
X
130
XI
143
XII
150
XIII
158
XXII
279
XXIII
289
XXIV
305
XXV
315
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Page 151 - Darkness was coming on, and for a while he played about among the trees, pleasuring in his freedom. Then, and quite suddenly, he became aware of loneliness. He sat down to consider, listening to the silence of the forest and perturbed by it. That nothing moved nor sounded, seemed ominous. He felt the lurking of danger, unseen and unguessed. He was suspicious of the looming bulks of the trees and of the dark shadows that might conceal all manner of perilous things. Then it was cold. Here was no warm...
Page 294 - The latter were afraid of him, while he merely refrained from attacking them. This because he considered that they were likewise possessions of the master. Between White Fang and them existed a neutrality and no more. They cooked for the master and washed the dishes and did other things just as Matt had done up in the Klondike. They were, in short, appurtenances of the household. Outside the household there was even more for White Fang to learn. The master's domain was wide and complex, yet it had...
Page 107 - There were two kinds of life, — his own kind and the other kind. His own kind included his mother and himself. The other kind included all live things that moved. But the other kind was divided. One portion was what his own kind killed and ate. This portion was composed of the non-killers and the small killers. The other portion killed and ate his own kind, or was killed and eaten by his own kind. And out of this classification arose the law. The aim of life was meat. Life itself was meat. Life...
Page 333 - THE BORROWER WILL BE CHARGED AN OVERDUE FEE IF THIS BOOK 18 NOT RETURNED TO THE LIBRARY ON OR BEFORE THE LAST DATE STAMPED BELOW. NON-RECEIPT OF OVERDUE NOTICES DOES NOT EXEMPT THE BORROWER FROM OVERDUE FEES. I...
Page 156 - Beaver, every inch of his progress becoming slower and more painful. At last he lay at the master's feet, into whose possession he now surrendered himself, voluntarily, body and soul. Of his own choice, he came in to sit by man's fire and to be ruled by him.
Page 276 - ... growl. Instead, and after a wistful, searching look, he snuggled in, burrowing his head out of sight between the master's arm and body. "There she blows!" Matt cried. From the Yukon arose the hoarse bellowing of a river steamboat. "You've got to cut it short. Be sure and lock the front door. I'll go out the back. Get a move on!" The two doors slammed at the same moment, and Weedon Scott waited for Matt to come around to the front. From inside the door came a low whining and sobbing. Then there...
Page 73 - But the porcupine, squealing and grunting, with disrupted anatomy trying feebly to roll up into its ball-protection, flicked out its tail again, and again the big cat squalled with hurt and astonishment. Then she fell to backing away and sneezing, her nose bristling with quills like a monstrous pin-cushion. She brushed her nose with her paws, trying to dislodge the fiery darts, thrust it into the snow, and rubbed it against twigs and branches, all the time leaping about, ahead, sidewise, up and down,...
Page 239 - Oh, one of them crack-a-jack minin' experts. He's in with all the big bugs. If you want to keep out of trouble, you'll steer clear of him, that's my talk. He's all hunky with the officials. The Gold Commissioner's a special pal of his." "I thought he must be somebody," was the faro-dealer's comment.
Page 261 - Matt — as a possession of his master. His master rarely fed him. Matt did that, it was his business ; yet White Fang divined that it was his master's food he ate and that it was his master who thus fed him vicariously.
Page 259 - Scott's ear and sympathy were fine enough to catch the new note all but drowned in the fierceness — the note that was the faintest hint of a croon of content and that none but he could hear. As the days went by, the evolution of like into love was accelerated. White Fang himself began to grow aware of it, though in his consciousness he knew not what love was. It manifested itself to him as a void in his being — a hungry, aching, yearning void that clamored to be filled.

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