The Trees of California

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Curtis & Welch, 1909 - Trees - 228 pages
 

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Page 6 - For about twenty miles it could only be compared to a park which had originally been planted with the true old English oak; the underwood, that had probably attained its early growth, had the appearance of having been cleared away, and had left the stately lords of the forest in complete possession of the soil, which was covered with luxuriant herbage, and beautifully diversified with pleasing eminences and...
Page 6 - ... diversified with pleasing eminences and valleys; which with the range of lofty rugged mountains that bounded the prospect, required only to be adorned with the neat habitations of an industrious people, to produce a scene not inferior to the most studied effect of taste in the disposal of grounds.
Page 6 - ... on both sides by high mountains from the moisture supplied by either ocean, and longitudinally intersected by sierras which seemingly remain as naked as they were born ; and have reached at length the westward slopes of the high mountain barrier which, refreshed by the Pacific, bear the noble forests of the Sierra Nevada and the Coast Range, and among them trees which are the wonder of the world. As I stood in their shade, in the groves of Mariposa and Calaveras, and again under the canopy of...
Page 219 - ... of division, so as to produce new phloem and xylem. Capitate (relating to head). (1) Rounded, as the head of the stigma of the primrose ; or (2) growing in heads. Capsule (a small box). A dry, dehiscent seed vessel (formed of more than one carpel). Carpel (fruit). The megasporophyll ; hence either a simple pistil or one of the parts of a compound pistil. Carpellary. Relating to a carpel. Catkins. See Ament. Caulicle (a small stem). The initial stem in an embryo. Cell. The morphological or anatomical...
Page 207 - Distinguished generally by the anthers opening by a pore or small hole at the top of each cell, and from all the other orders with a monopetalous corolla, except the two foregoing, by having the stamens free from the corolla, as many or twice as many as its lobes. But the petals are sometimes entirely separate, especially in the third and fourth sub-families. Fruit several-celled. Style one. This large order comprises four very distinct sub-families, viz- : — 413.
Page 6 - For almost twenty miles it could be compared to a park which had originally been planted with the true old English oak; the underwood, that had probably attained its early growth, had the appearance of having been cleared away and had left the stately lords of the forest in complete possession of the soil...
Page 170 - ... near the sea, art and nature counsel "Plant only to restore." COAST VALLEY ROADS. When the road winds among the liveoaks of coast valley floors, there seems no question still of introducing foreign growth. What could be more satisfying than such "nature-planted" roadways? And to scatter these trees "whose rounded outlines are repeated in the soft curves of the foothills...
Page 210 - No other of our trees, to those who know it in its regions of finest development, makes so strong an appeal to man's imagination — to his love of color, of joyful bearing, of sense of magic, of surprise and change. He walks the woods in June or July and rustles the mass of gold-brown leaves fresh fallen under foot, or rides for unending weeks across the Mendocino ranges — and always with a sense of fresh interest and stimulation at the varying presence of this tree. WL JEPSON, in Trees of California.
Page 8 - In spite of our worship of the "practical" it is being more widely recognized that the cultivated man with keen intelligence and a broad and liberal outlook is getting more out of life and is really more practical after all than the so-called practical man who has narrowed his interests to those which concern his immediate personal needs, who is not stirred by the lure of the unknown, and who has "locked his door against the ideals" and imaginations of humanity.
Page 119 - Cupressus macrocarpa is limited to two localities on the ocean shore at the mouth of the Carmel River near Monterey. The Cypress Point Grove extends along the cliffs and low bluffs from Pescadero Point to Cypress Point, a distance of two miles, reaching inland about one-eighth of a o Fig.

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