The Waves

Front Cover
Wordsworth Editions, 2000 - Classical fiction - 172 pages
Introduction and Notes by Deborah Parsons, University of Birmingham. "I am writing to a rhythm and not to a plot", Virginia Woolf stated of her eighth novel, 'The Waves'. Widely regarded as one of her greatest and most original works,it conveys the rhythms of life in synchrony with the cycle of nature and the passage of time. Six children - Bernard, Susan, Rhoda, Neville, Jinny and Louis - meet in a garden close to the sea, their voices sounding over the constant echo of the waves that roll back and forth from the shore. The subsequent continuity of these six main characters, as they develop from childhood to maturity and follow different passions and ambitions, is interspersed with interludes from the timeless and unifying chorus of nature. In pure stream-of-consciousness style, Woolf presents a cross-section of multiple yet parallel lives, each marked by the disintegrating force of a mutual tragedy. 'The Waves' is her searching exploration of individual and collective identity, and the observations and emotions of life, from the simplicity and surging optimism of youth to the vacancy and despair of middle-age. AUTHOR: (Adeline) Virginia Woolf (1882-1941) was an English writer, whose innovative, experimental novels have had a lasting effect on the development of modern literature. Her books, such as 'Mrs Dalloway', 'The Waves' and 'To the Lighthouse', with their stream-of-consciousness structure, have led her to be recognised as one of the most significant writers of the twentieth century.
 

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User Review  - msaucier818 - LibraryThing

I know I am supposed to love Virginia Woolf, and I am really trying to, but this is now my third go around with her and I just can't do it. This book was all but impossible for me. I do not get the ... Read full review

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User Review  - missizicks - LibraryThing

I was surprised by how much I liked this book. It is more interesting than the other books I've read by Virginia Woolf. In it, Woolf has finally succeeded in breaking free of traditional narrative ... Read full review

Contents

GENERAL INTRODUCTION
v
BIBLIOGRAPHY
xvi
NOTES
169
WORDSWORTH CLASSICS
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Virginia Woolf was born in London, England on January 25, 1882. She was the daughter of the prominent literary critic Leslie Stephen. Her early education was obtained at home through her parents and governesses. After death of her father in 1904, her family moved to Bloomsbury, where they formed the nucleus of the Bloomsbury Group, a circle of philosophers, writers, and artists. During her lifetime, she wrote both fiction and non-fiction works. Her novels included Jacob's Room, Mrs. Dalloway, To the Lighthouse, Orlando, and Between the Acts. Her non-fiction books included The Common Reader, A Room of One's Own, Three Guineas, The Captain's Death Bed and Other Essays, and The Death of the Moth and Other Essays. Having had periods of depression throughout her life and fearing a final mental breakdown from which she might not recover, Woolf drowned herself on March 28, 1941 at the age of 59. Her husband published part of her farewell letter to deny that she had taken her life because she could not face the terrible times of war.

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