Plays (Google eBook)

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Ticknor and Fields, 1855 - 62 pages
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Page 69 - Cloth. Price $1.50. SIR LAUNFAL. New Edition. Price 25 cents. A FABLE FOR CRITICS. New Edition. Price 50 cents.
Page 61 - Howe'er it be, it seems to me, Tis only noble to be good. Kind hearts are more than coronets, And simple faith than Norman blood.
Page 69 - NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE'S WRITINGS. TWICE-TOLD TALES. Two Volumes. Price $1.50. THE SCARLET LETTER. Price 75 cents. THE HOUSE OF THE SEVEN GABLES. Price $1.00. THE SNOW IMAGE, AND OTHER TWICE-TOLD TALES. Price 75 cents. THE BLITHEDALE ROMANCE. * Price 75 cents.
Page 72 - BAYARD TAYLOR. POEMS. Cloth. Price 63 cents. JOHN G. SAXE. POEMS. With Portrait. Boards, 63 cents. Cloth, 75 cents. HENRY T. TUCKERMAN. POEMS. Cloth. Price 75 cents. BO WRING'S MATINS AND VESPERS. Price 50 cents. GEORGE LUNT. LYRIC POEMS, &c. 1 vol. Cloth, 63 cents.
Page 17 - This fashion-worship has made heathens and hypocrites of you all! Deception is your household God! A man laughs as if he were crying, and cries as if he were laughing in his sleeve. Everything is something else from what it seems to be. I have lived in your house only three days, and I've heard more lies than were ever invented during a Presidential election!
Page 37 - GERTRUDE: [Musingly] Friday night, while supper is serving, he is to meet Millinette here and explain — what? This man is an impostor! His insulting me — his familiarity with Millinette — his whole conduct — prove it. If I tell Mrs. Tiffany this she will disbelieve me, and one word may place this so-called Count on his guard. To convince Seraphina would be equally difficult, and her rashness and infatuation may render her miserable for life. No— she shall be saved! I must devise some plan...
Page 6 - Now, Seraphina my dear, don't be too particular in your attentions to gentlemen not eligible. There is Count Jolimaitre, decidedly the most fashionable foreigner in town, — and so refined,— so much accustomed to associate with the first nobility in his own country that he can hardly tolerate the vulgarity of Americans in general. You may devote yourself to him. Mrs. Proudacre is dying to become acquainted with him. By the by, if she or her daughters should happen to drop in, be sure you don't...
Page 35 - Fly? Ah! trompeur! Vat for you fly from Paris? Vat for you leave me— and I love you so much? Ven you sick — you almost die — did I not stay by you — take care of you — and you have no else friend? Vat for you leave Paris? Count: Never allude to disagreeable subjects, mon enfant!
Page 20 - I have my mania, — as some wise person declares that all mankind have, — and mine is a love of independence! In Geneva, my wants were supplied by two kind old maiden ladies, upon whom I know not that I have any claim.
Page 11 - Royale, or if you had lived in London — felt at home at St. James's, and every afternoon driven a couple of Lords and a Duchess through Hyde Park, you would find America — where you have no kings, queens, lords, nor ladies — insupportable!

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