The Making of the Earth

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H. Holt, 1912 - Earth - 248 pages
 

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Page 218 - is a definite combination of heterogeneous changes, both simultaneous and successive, in correspondence with external coexistences and sequences.
Page 154 - Green) illustrate this tetrahedral collapse for short tubes ; and that it is considered probable by some geodists is shown by the following quotation from ED Preston : " Nothing is more in accordance with the action of physical laws than that the Earth is contracting in approximately a tetrahedral form.
Page 218 - Life is a series of definite and successive changes, both of structure and composition, which take place within an individual without destroying its identity.
Page 132 - Similar Instances are not to be neglected, in the Greater Portions of the World's Conformation ; such as Africa and the Peruvian Continent, which reaches to the Straits of Magellan ; both of which possess a similar Isthmus and similar Capes, a circumstance not to be attributed to mere accident^,,-^-1 Again ; the New and Old World are both of them broad and expanded towards the North, and narrow and pointed towards the South.
Page 131 - ... inverted plant is not absurd. For the head is the root of the nerves and animal faculties, and the seminal parts are the lowest, not including the extremities of the legs and arms. But in the plant, the root (which resembles the head) is regularly placed in the lowest, and the seeds in the highest part. Lastly, we must particularly recommend and suggest, that man's present industry in the investigation and compilation of natural history be entirely changed, and directed to the reverse of the...
Page 154 - Nothing is more in accordance with the action of physical laws than that the earth is contracting in approximately a tetrahedral form. Given a collapsing homogeneous spherical envelope, it will assume that regular shape which most readily disposes of the excess of its surface dimensions, or, in other words, the shape that most easily relieves the tangential strains; for, while the sphere is of all geometrical bodies the one with a minimum surface for a given capacity, the tetrahedron gives a maximum...
Page ii - ARTHUR THOMSON and PATRICK GEDDES THE ANIMAL WORLD By FW GAMBLE INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICS By AN WHITEHEAD ASTRONOMY By AR HINKS PSYCHICAL RESEARCH . . . . By WF BARRETT THE EVOLUTION OF PLANTS By DH SCOTT CRIME AND INSANITY . . . . By CA MERCIER MATTER AND ENERGY .... By F. SODDY PSYCHOLOGY By W.
Page 99 - Among the thickest masses of sedimentary rock — those of the ancient palaeozoic systems — no features recur more continually than alternations of different sediments, and surfaces of rock covered with well-preserved ripplemarks, trails and burrows of annelides, polygonal and irregular desiccation marks, like the cracks at the bottom of a sun-dried muddy pool. These phenomena unequivocally point to shallow and even littoral waters.
Page 100 - They can be interpreted only in one way, viz., that the formations in question began to be laid down in shallow water; that during their formation the area of deposit gradually subsided for thousands of feet ; yet that the rate of accumulation of sediment kept pace on the whole with this depression ; and hence that the original shallow-water character of the deposits remained, even after the original sea-bottom had been buried under a vast mass of sedimentary matter.
Page 111 - Islands, both situated near to continents, leaving almost the whole of the vast areas of the Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, and Southern oceans, without a solitary relic of the great islands or continents supposed to have sunk beneath their waves.

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