Japan and Africa: Big Business and Diplomacy

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Africa World Press, 1997 - Political Science - 298 pages
Jun Morikawa elucidates the constellation of political, economic and bureaucratic participation in the formulation of Japanese foreign policy. He illustrates clearly how Japan develops its policies, and how it uses corporations as an arm of government in its relations with the rest of the world. Japan's endemic racism is examined - and at the same time anti-racism which found expression in anti-apartheid organisations and a programme of 'overseas co-operation volunteers'. The critical eye with which the author looks into the heart of Japan's government-business nexus is bound to stir controversy. His readable narrative is supplemented by extensive documentation and statistics.
 

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Contents

the Basic Framework
8
Postwar Development
52
Actors in the External Decisionmaking Structure
91
Emperor Haile Selassie I of Ethiopia with Emperor Hirohito
116
Involvement
118
Postscript
234
APPENDIXES
242
Japanese companies with offices in South Africa
248
Organisation of Keidanren international
254
116
297
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