Bangladesh: From a Nation to a State

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Westview Press, Oct 6, 1998 - History - 176 pages
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In 1996, Bangladesh celebrates its 25th anniversary. When the country became independent from Pakistan in 1971, it proclaimed itself a parliamentary democracy with four goals—democracy, secularism, socialism, and nationalism. This comprehensive introduction to Bangladesh’s history, polity, economy, and society reassesses its successes and failures in reaching these goals after a quarter century of nationhood.Craig Baxter traces the development of national identity in the region, first as part of India and then of Pakistan, and the slow evolution toward statehood. He also explores the formative periods of Hindu, Buddhist, Muslim, and British government that preceded Pakistani rule and subsequent independence. Anyone wishing to understand this poor, populous, but ambitious young nation will find this book an invaluable reference.
 

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Contents

A DELTA AND ITS PEOPLE
1
Language
8
The Palas and the Senas
14
Under Mughal Rules
20
Notes
26
Notes
32
BENGAL UNDER THE RAJ
35
Dyarchy
43
Between Mujib and Zia
92
The Sattar Interlude
104
Ershad as a Civilian
112
The Begum Zia Government
121
A Note on Government in Bangladesh
129
Social Issues
138
BANGLADESH IN THE WORLD SYSTEM
145
The Islamic States
151

TOWARD INDEPENDENCE
49
Notes
58
Political Steps Toward the Dissolution of Pakistan
70
Pakistan Under Ayub 19581969
76
DEMOCRACY AUTHORITARIANISM
83
The Military
157
Bibliographic Note
163
Index
169
Copyright

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Page 42 - The British Government and the Government of India, on whom the responsibility lies for the welfare and advancement of the Indian peoples, must be judges of the time and measure of each advance, and they must be guided by the co-operation received from those upon whom new opportunities of service will thus be conferred and by the extent to which it is found that confidence can be reposed in their sense of responsibility.
Page 42 - The policy of His Majesty's Government, with which the Government of India are in complete accord, is that of the increasing association of Indians in every branch of the administration and the gradual development of self-governing institutions with a view to the progressive realisation of responsible government in India as an integral part of the British Empire.
Page 63 - But let me make it very clear to you that the State Language of Pakistan is going to be Urdu and no other language.
Page 69 - You are free; you are free to go to your temples, you are free to go to your mosques or to any other places of worship in this State of Pakistan. You may belong to any religion or caste or creed - that has nothing to do with the business of the State.
Page 41 - Government with regard to any of its measures. (b) To protect and advance the political rights and interests of the Musalmans of India, and to respectfully represent their needs and aspirations to the Government.
Page 41 - To promote among the Musalmans of India feelings of loyalty to the British Government and to remove any misconceptions that may arise as to the intentions of Government with regard to any of its measures...
Page 45 - North-West Frontier Province, Sind and Baluchistan amalgamated into a single state. Self-government within the British Empire, or without the British Empire, the formation of a consolidated North-West Indian Muslim state appears to me to be the final destiny of the Muslims at least of North-West India.
Page 45 - I would like to see the Punjab, the North- West Frontier Province Sind and Baluchistan amalgamated into a single state. Selfgovernment within the British Empire, or without the British Empire, the formation of a consolidated North-West Indian Muslim state appears to me the final destiny of the Muslims at least of North- West India.
Page 11 - The people of Pakistan consist of a variety of races each with its own historical background and culture. East Bengalis, who constitute the bulk of the population, probably belong to the very original Indian races. It would be no exaggeration to say that up to the creation of Pakistan, they had not known any real freedom or sovereignty. They have been in turn ruled either by the caste Hindus, Moghuls, Pathans, or the British.
Page 78 - Provinces that the Provinces shall have maximum autonomy, that is to say maximum legislative, administrative and financial powers but the Federal Government shall also have adequate powers including legislative, administrative and financial powers, to discharge its responsibilities in relation to external and internal affairs and to preserve the independence and territorial integrity of the country.

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About the author (1998)

Craig Baxter is professor emeritus of politics and history at Juanita College.

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