The Cult of the Amateur: How Today's Internet is Killing Our Culture and Assaulting Our Economy

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Nicholas Brealey, 2007 - Blogs - 228 pages
10 Reviews
Our most valued cultural institutions - our professional newspapers,magazines, music, and movies - are being overtaken by an avalanche ofamateur, user-generated free content.....In today's self-broadcasting culture, where amateurism is celebrated and anyone with an opinion, however ill-informed, can publish a blog, post a video on YouTube, or change an entry on Wikipedia, the distinction between trained expert and uninformed amateur becomes dangerously blurred. When anonymous bloggers and videographers, unconstrained by professional standards or editorial filters, can alter the public debate and manipulate public opinion, truth becomes a commodity to be bought, sold, packaged, and reinvented.....Our 'cut-and-paste' online culture - in which intellectual property is freely swapped, downloaded, remashed, and aggregated - threatens over 200 years of copyright protection and intellectual property rights, robbing artists, authors, journalists, musicians, editors, and producers of the fruits of their creative labours. Further, advertising revenue is being siphoned off by free classified ads on sites like Craigslist; television networks are under attack from free user-generated programming on YouTube and the like; filesharing and digital piracy have devastated the multibillion-dollar music business and threaten to undermine our movie industry. The very anonymity that Web 2.0 offers calls into question the reliability of the information we receive and creates an environment in which sexual predators and identity thieves can roam free.....While no Luddite, Keen pioneered several Internet startups himself-he urges us to consider the consequences of blindly supporting a culture that endorses plagiarism and piracy and that fundamentally weakens traditional media and creative institutions.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - getaneha - LibraryThing

In this book, Andrew Keen categorically dismisses the notion that anyone anywhere anytime could take it on its hands to publish their works without any credentials from an established authority. He ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - mjmontagne - LibraryThing

A very good book, but one that is fairly predictable in many ways. Keen really seems overly nostalgic about 20th century technologies. The author works hard to present an argument that basically ... Read full review

Contents

introduction
the great seduction
the noble amateur 35
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Andrew Keen is an English digital media entrepreneur and Silicon Valley insider whose popular writing about culture, media, and technology has been featured in many newspapers and magazines including

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