The Chicago School: How the University of Chicago Assembled the Thinkers Who Revolutionized Economics and Business

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Agate Publishing, Mar 1, 2009 - Business & Economics - 432 pages
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When Richard Nixon said “We are all Keynesians now” in 1971, few could have predicted that the next three decades would result in a complete transformation of the global economic landscape. The transformation was led by a small, relatively obscure group within the University of Chicago’s business school and its departments of economics and political science. These thinkers — including Milton Friedman, Gary Becker, George Stigler, Robert Lucas, and others — revolutionized economic orthodoxy in the second half of the 20th century, dominated the Nobel Prizes awarded in economics, and changed how business is done around the world. Written by a leading European economic thinker, The Chicago School is the first in-depth look at how this remarkable group came together. Exhaustively detailed, it provides a close recounting of the decade-by-decade progress of the Chicago School's evolution. As such, it's an essential contribution to the intellectual history of our time.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Chapter One
19
Chapter Two
45
Chapter Three
75
Chapter Four
109
Chapter Five
155
Chapter Six
197
Chapter Seven
239
Chapter Eight
287
Chapter Nine
323
Epilogue
357
Bibliography
361
Notes
393
Index
415
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About the author (2009)

Johan Van Overtveldt, PhD, is the director of the Belgium-based think tank VKW Metena, which works on a breadth of economics-related issues. Formerly editor-in-chief of the Belgian newsmagazine Trends, he has written several books in Dutch, and contributes to the Wall Street Journal Europe and other publications.

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