The Philosophy of Desire in the Buddhist Pali Canon

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Psychology Press, 2005 - History - 267 pages
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David Webster explores the notion of desire as found in the Buddhist Pali Canon. Beginning by addressing the idea of a 'paradox of desire', whereby we must desire to end desire, the varieties of desire that are articulated in the Pali texts are examined. A range of views of desire, as found in Western thought, are presented as well as Hindu and Jain approaches. An exploration of the concept of ditthi(view or opinion) is also provided, exploring the way in which 'holding views' can be seen as analogous to the process of desiring. Other subjects investigated include the mind-body relationship, the range of Pali terms for desire, and desire's positive spiritual value. A comparative exploration of the various approaches completes the work.

 

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about difference in desire

Contents

The paradox of desire
2
Scope of this study
8
desire and the transformation of living
11
sources and textual issues
16
Desire in nonBuddhist Indian religion
49
Desire as the enemy of the spiritual
57
Desire in the Bhagavad Gītā
70
the Kāma Sūtra
76
The mindbody relationship
158
a structural analogy?
165
Noview or rightview?
171
A paradox of views?
179
Introduction
187
challenging a bipolar distinction
193
seeking the end of the world?
199
Glossary
206

Conclusion
86
the dynamics of desire
143
Desire and paticcasamuppāda
151

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About the author (2005)

David Webster is Lecturer in Religious Studies at the University of Gloucestershire.

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