Encyclopaedia Britannica; Or A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, and Miscellaneous Literature, Volume 10

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Archibald Constable, 1823 - Encyclopedias and dictionaries
 

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Page 74 - tis, to cast one's eyes so low ! The crows, and choughs, that wing the midway air, Show scarce so gross as beetles: Halfway down Hangs one that gathers samphire ; dreadful trade ! Methinks, he seems no bigger than his head : The fishermen, that walk upon the beach, Appear like mice ; and yon...
Page 74 - Insuperable height of loftiest shade, Cedar, and pine, and fir, and branching palm, A sylvan scene; and as the ranks ascend Shade above shade, a woody theatre Of stateliest view.
Page 78 - The cloud-capt towers, the gorgeous palaces, The solemn temples, the great globe itself; * Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve, And, like the baseless fabric of a vision, Leave not a wreck behind.
Page 76 - Diluit; implentur fossae, et cava flumina crescunt Cum sonitu, fervetque fretis spirantibus aequor. Ipse Pater media nimborum in nocte corusca Fulmina molitur dextra, quo maxima motu Terra tremit, fugere ferae et mortalia corda 330 Per gentes humilis stravit pavor...
Page 214 - ... the glory of the English law consists in clearly defining the times, the causes, and the extent, when, wherefore, and to what degree, the imprisonment of the subject may be lawful. This it is, which induces the absolute necessity of expressing upon every commitment the reason for which it is made : that the court upon a habeas corpus may examine into its validity ; and according to the circumstances of the case may discharge, admit to bail, or remand the prisoner.
Page 351 - For, to say nothing of half the birds, and some quadrupeds which are almost entirely supported by them, worms seem to be the great promoters of vegetation, which would proceed but lamely without them, by boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and rendering it pervious to rains and the fibres of plants, by drawing straws and stalks of leaves and twigs into it ; and, most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth called worm-casts, which, being their excrement, is a fine...
Page 380 - But, where each science lifts its modern type, Hist'ry her pot, divinity her pipe, While proud philosophy repines to show, Dishonest sight ! his breeches rent below ; Embrowned with native bronze, lo ! Henley stands, Tuning his voice, and balancing his hands. How fluent nonsense trickles from his tongue ! How sweet the periods, neither said, nor sung ! Still break the benches, Henley ! with thy strain, While Sherlock, Hare, and Gibson preach in vain.
Page 73 - The cease of majesty Dies not alone, but like a gulf doth draw What's near it with it; it is a massy wheel, Fix'd on the summit of the highest mount, To whose huge spokes ten thousand lesser things Are mortis'd and adjoin'd; which, when it falls, Each small annexment, petty consequence, Attends the boisterous ruin. Never alone Did the king sigh, but with a general groan.
Page 74 - So on he fares, and to the border comes Of Eden, where delicious Paradise, Now nearer, crowns with her enclosure green, As with a rural mound, the champaign head Of a steep wilderness...
Page 213 - ... but also during the vacation, by a fiat from the chief justice or any other of the judges, and running into all parts of the king's dominions ; for the king is at all times entitled to have an account, why the liberty of any of his subjects is restrained, wherever that restraint may be inflicted.

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