Life's Problems: Essays; Moral, Social, and Psychological

Front Cover
Bell and Daldy, 1857 - Conduct of life - 277 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 232 - For that which I do I allow not: for what I would, that do I not; but what I hate, that do I. If then I do that which I would not, I consent unto the law that it is good. Now then it is no more I that do it, but sin that dwelleth in me.
Page 128 - Whatever theory we adopt respecting the foundation of the social union, and under whatever political institutions we live, there is a circle around every individual human being, which no government, be it that of one, of a few, or of the many, ought to be permitted [to overstep...
Page 185 - Glorious, indeed, is the world of God around us, but more glorious the world of God within us.
Page 128 - ... there is a circle around every individual human being, which no government, be it that of one, of a few, or of the many, ought to be permitted to overstep : there is a part of the life of every person who has come to years of discretion, within which the individuality of that person ought to reign uncontrolled either by any other individual or by the public collectively.
Page 232 - I that do it, but sin that dwelleth in me; for I know that in me, that is, in my flesh, dwelleth no good thing; for to will is present with me, but how to perform that which is good I find not; for the good that I would, I do not, but the evil which I would not, that I do.
Page 146 - But he who gives but a slender mite, And gives to that which is out of sight, That thread of the all-sustaining Beauty Which runs through all and doth all unite, — The hand cannot clasp the whole of his alms, The heart outstretches its eager palms, For a god goes with it and makes it store To the soul that was starving in darkness before.
Page 214 - God's heart? The sneer, I must say, seems to me but a shallow one. What are faults, what are the outward details of a life, if the inner secret of it, the remorse, temptations, true, often-baffled, never-ended struggle of it, be forgotten? 'It is not in man that walketh to direct his steps.
Page 163 - The greatest obstacle to being heroic • is the doubt whether one may not be going to prove one's self a fool ; the truest heroism is, to resist the doubt ; and the profoundest wisdom, to know when it ought to be resisted, and when to be obeyed.
Page 146 - That is no true alms which the hand can hold; He gives nothing but worthless gold Who gives from a sense of duty; But he who gives but a slender mite, And gives to that which is out of sight, That thread of the all-sustaining Beauty Which runs through all and doth all unite, — The hand cannot clasp the whole of his alms, The heart outstretches its eager palms.
Page 185 - But to resume our old theme of scholars and their whereabout,' said the Baron, with an unusual glow, caught no doubt from the golden sunshine, imprisoned, like the student Anselmus, in the glass bottle ; ' where should the scholar live ? In solitude or in society ? In the green stillness of the country, where he can hear the heart of nature beat, or in the dark, gray city...

Bibliographic information