Biology: Understanding Life

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Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2000 - Medical - 837 pages
Designed for a one or two semester non-majors course in introductory biology taught at most two and four-year colleges. This course typically fulfills a general education requirement, and rather than emphasizing mastery of technical topics, it focuses on the understanding of biological ideas and concepts, how they relate to real life, and appreciating the scientific methods and thought processes. Given the authors' work in and dedication to science education, this text's writing style, pedagogy, and integrated support package are all based on classroom-tested teaching strategies and learning theory. The result is a learning program that enhances the effectiveness & efficiency of the teaching and learning experience in the introductory biology course like no other before it.
 

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Organization helps us make sense of our surroundings. Some people organize their sock drawer by color. Books in a liberty are often organized by topic. Food in a grocery store is organized so we to know just where to find something. For scientists understand how living things are related. It also allows scientists to communicate about all forms of life. For example suppose a scientists in the United States writes about a specific group of animals. Other scientists around the world will know exactly which group of animals the writer is referring to. But how do scientists decide which organisms to group together? Do they just use a particular process. Scientists organize the living world using a process called taxonomy which is the science of classifying organisms based on shared {Structures,Functions, and relationships to other organisms. Living things also can be classified according to the way in which they obtain food. Think about the differences between plants and animals. Plants make their own food and are called autotroph. Animals must consume other organisms and are called heterophs. This difference classifies plants ans animals into two separate groups. Method of reproduction can be used to classify organisms into even smaller groups.  

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BIOLOGY

Contents

e How Science Works 8
36
Cells and How They Transform Energy
59
Small molecules move into and oui of cells by 6 3 Capturing light energy in chemical bonds
107
Key Concepts Key Terms Learning Portfolio
113
Energy is stored and released during chemical 6 11 The electron transport chain
120
Patterns and Levels
130
Tissues are organized into organs and organs
146
Digestion
154
Various types of evidence help scientists
539
I Just Wondering
553
Cell Structure and Function 58 Chapter 25 The Evolution of Life
554
Multicellular organisms evolved from the first
559
Primates reflect a treedwelling heritage
570
An Overview of the Five Kingdoms
588
Gathering Storing and Using Kingdoms
590
Bacteria are prokaryotic cells
601

Human digestion is mechanical and chemical
161
H Just Wondering
172
Human respiration uses special organs
182
B Just Wondering
193
Transport with closed circulatory systems
199
Human blood is a transport fluid
210
e How Science Works
216
Human immunity is both nonspecific
223
Excretion
240
Connections
254
U Just Wondering
276
The Nervous System
282
The human peripheral nervous system carries
296
Protection Support
330
Human skin bones and muscles perform many
336
connections central brain endocrine glands
357
Genetics Reproduction and Development
378
Patterns
438
traits
447
An Introduction Chapter 21 Human Genetics
456
cancer
462
How Scientists Do Their Work 1 Chapter 22 Sex and Reproduction
480
Human reproduction is sexual and fertilization
486
I Just Wondering
506
Understanding Life 16 Chapter 23 Development before Birth
508
relationships among animals
509
The embryo
518
newborn
525
Darwin developed the theory
531
The Chemistry of Life 32
532
Cells and How They Transform Chapter 24 The Scientific Evidence
538
Protists and Fungi
612
Fungi are multicellular eukaryotic organisms
626
O Just Wondering
633
Systems Chapter 28 Plants Reproductive Patterns
636
Plants have two different multicellular
639
Plant hormones regulate plant growth
652
Digestion 154 and Function
658
Structure and Function 658 30 6 Clams snails and octupuses Mollusca 686
659
Respiration 176 Chapter 30 Invertebrates
676
Invertebrates
679
Roundworms are bilaterally symmetrical
685
Circulation 196 Chapter 31 Chordates and Vertebrates
696
Defense against Disease 220
719
The Nervous System 282 Chapter 33 Population Ecology
742
33 5 Demography
750
The Senses 306 Chapter 34 Interactions within
758
Some animals can change their behaviors based community
760
Social behaviors ultimately aid the reproductive 34 4 Commensalism
768
Why do people yawn? Chapter 35 Ecosystems
774
Hormones 356 Chapter 36 Biomes and Life Zones
792
Genetics Reproduction and Chapter 37 The Biosphere Today
816
Biomes and Life Zones of The land provides a variety of resources
818
Biomes cover wide geographic areas ensuring a safe water supply
828
Aquatic life zones cover the majority of the Key Concepts Key Terms Learning Portfolio
3
Biotechnology
17
I Just Wondering 797
38
Glossary
19
systems
9
Credits
33
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About the author (2000)

Sandra Alters is formerly a tenured professor of biology and education at the University of Missouri-St. Louis and a professor of biology at Salem State College (MA). After teaching for over 25 years and teaching non-majors introductory biology for 10 years, Sandy left academia to write full time. She has over 20 years experience in science textbook writing in particular and science writing in general. She and her husband Brian are the only Ph.D. science educators currently authoring a non-majors college biology textbook. This book and its related ancillaries reflect their strong focus on science education.

Brian Alters, Sir William Dawson Scholar, holds appointments internationally at McGill University, Montreal, where he recently won the university's highest teaching award, and at Harvard University, Cambridge. Brian is founder and director of the Evolution Education Research Center, a joint involvement between professors of McGill and Harvard universities. He writes primarily about evolution education and teaching.

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