The English Works of Thomas Hobbes of Malmesbury, Volume 7

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Sir William Molesworth
J. Bohn, 1845 - Philosophy
 

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Page 184 - ... own operation. The reason whereof is this, that the science of every subject is derived from a precognition of the causes, generation, and construction of the same; and consequently where the causes are known, there is place for demonstration, but not where the causes are to seek for. Geometry therefore is demonstrable, for the lines and figures from which we reason are drawn and described by ourselves; and civil philosophy is demonstrable, because we mat(e the commonwealth ourselves.
Page 7 - ... apology for my Leviathan ; not that I rely upon apologies, but upon your majesty's most gracious general pardon. That which is in it of theology contrary to the general current of divines is not put there as my opinion, but propounded with submission to those who have the power ecclesiastical, — I did never after, either in writing or discourse, maintain it.
Page 184 - ... are known, there is place for demonstration, but not where the causes are to seek for. Geometry therefore is demonstrable, for the lines and figures from which we reason are drawn and described by ourselves; and civil philosophy is demonstrable, because we make the commonwealth ourselves. But because of natural bodies we know not the construction, but seek it from the effetcs, there lies no demonstration of what the causes be we seek for, but only of what they may be.
Page 242 - ... rotten beneath his feet he has the power of sustaining himself by raising an unseen prop, or somewhat extending his base, without allowing the reader to think that he is employing any art to retain his position. His self-confidence was never disturbed. With unmatched presumption he affirms that he is " the first that hath made the grounds of geometry firm and coherent.
Page 408 - Catonem avunculum tuum cum in senatu sententiam diceret locos graves ex philosophia tractare abhorrentes ab hoc usu forensi et publico, sed dicendo consequi tamen ut illa etiam 2 populo probabilia viderentur.
Page 336 - framed the minds of a thousand gentlemen to a conscientious obedience to present government, which otherwise would have wavered in that...
Page 350 - Do you think I can be an atheist and not know it ? Or knowing it, durst have offered my atheism to the press...
Page 468 - That which I have written of it is grounded especially upon that wch about 1 6 yeares since I affirmed to your Lopp at Welbeck, that light is a fancy in the minde, caused by motion in the braine...
Page 464 - Letter v.^ pass that way, or none at all. For if it pass, though in small quantity, yet it argues food proportionable, which may, being little, bee given her secretly and pass through the shrunken intestine, which may easily be kept clean. Thirdly, whether no urine at all pass : for liquors also nourish as they go. I think it were somewhat inhumane to examin these things too nearly, when it so little concerneth the commonwealth : nor do I know of any law that authoriseth a Justice of peace, or other...
Page 6 - ... he that supposing some one or more motions, can derive from them the necessity of that effect whose cause is required, has done all that is to be expected from natural reason. And though he prove not that the thing was thus produced, yet he proves that thus it may be produced . . . which is as useful as if the causes themselves were known

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